The diphthong in "smoke"

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CJ 4 life

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I know the American pronounciation of the diphthong in words like "smoke", "boat", "go" is produced as "OU", with the first part of the diphthong as a CLOSE "O", but I often hear an OPEN "O" too, for example the "O" of "dog". Can I pronounce it both ways? Does this depend on the speaker? or what?
 

Buddhaheart

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An open “o” /]/ is not a diphthong. We pronounce the word “dog” as /d]+g/ or dY+g/, i.e., with the open “o” (the Cardinal vowel 6) or the script “A” (Cardinal 5) but never as a diphthong /c/ or /o/.
 

CJ 4 life

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An open “o” /]/ is not a diphthong. We pronounce the word “dog” as /d]+g/ or dY+g/, i.e., with the open “o” (the Cardinal vowel 6) or the script “A” (Cardinal 5) but never as a diphthong /c/ or /o/.
No, maybe you didn't get it. I meant to ask if the first part of the diphthong "OU" (like in "smoke") can be pronounce STILL as a diphthong, but with the first part (the "O" part) as a opened "O", instead of using the closed one; cause I heard pronounciations like this all the time.
 

Anglika

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No, maybe you didn't get it. I meant to ask if the first part of the diphthong "OU" (like in "smoke") can be pronounce STILL as a diphthong, but with the first part (the "O" part) as a opened "O", instead of using the closed one; cause I heard pronounciations like this all the time.

Perhaps it would help if you gave examples of such words, where you heard them and whether the speaker was using a regional accent.
 

CJ 4 life

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Perhaps it would help if you gave examples of such words, where you heard them and whether the speaker was using a regional accent.
I got the video on my computer. How can I put it in the Internet?
 

CJ 4 life

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Upload it on YouTube - Broadcast Yourself. . You need to create a free account for this though.
OK, thank you, I think it's easier and faster for me to give you the link to another website, COMING SOON , it's right the first sentence of the video, when he says:"..., it was time to go HOME" he pronounce "home" with a clear opened "o" here, doesn't he?
 

CJ 4 life

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Could anyone tell me if he pronounce "home" with an opened "O" (something like "hawm"), and, if he does, why?
 

bhaisahab

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Could anyone tell me if he pronounce "home" with an opened "O" (something like "hawm"), and, if he does, why?

It's an American accent.
:)
 

CJ 4 life

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It's an American accent.
:)
I kinda know it's an American accent, I just wanted to make sure he pronounces an opened "O", but above all, WHY? I searched the Net but I didn't find this type of pronounciation. bhaisahab, what do you mean by saying it's an American accent, the accent in which he speaks or just this particular type of pronounciation?
 

Anglika

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Almost impossible to answer "why does someone speak in this way" unless you know something about them.

He may come from a dialectical group, he may be speaking in a foreign language, he may have a hearing disability, he may be using a fashionable accent.

Who is the person and where does he come from?
 

CJ 4 life

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Almost impossible to answer "why does someone speak in this way" unless you know something about them.

He may come from a dialectical group, he may be speaking in a foreign language, he may have a hearing disability, he may be using a fashionable accent.

Who is the person and where does he come from?
He's the main character of the videogame GTA San Andreas, of course American, he comes from Los Angeles and speaks AAVE (this doesn't matter though, I heard a lot of different people (males and females) pronounce this diphthong in this way). But first, you confirm that he pronounce "home" like "hawm", right?
 

Uncle M

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I'm not at all familiar with the way by which Buddaheart explains pronunciation but I do know that in the UK the long O sound is altered to OR by people from the north (Yorkshire, Lancashire) or Scotland, or even Wales:

Horm (for home), Snor (for Snow) and so on.

In some dialects, home can become almost hum, or snow snahr.

(Buddaheart, is there some established practice that describes phonetics and where could I find reference to it?)

Dave
 

CJ 4 life

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I'm not at all familiar with the way by which Buddaheart explains pronunciation but I do know that in the UK the long O sound is altered to OR by people from the north (Yorkshire, Lancashire) or Scotland, or even Wales:

Horm (for home), Snor (for Snow) and so on.

In some dialects, home can become almost hum, or snow snahr.

(Buddaheart, is there some established practice that describes phonetics and where could I find reference to it?)

Dave
I don't know about Buddaheart, but stick to the point;what you think would be the best phonetic transcription for "home" in the video I linked?
 
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