The dutch gourage

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Humbertti

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Please tell me how much you understand the reality in this, and what wrong with this

The Wulf and the cheep.

Was told that he has served his wartime as a ss man, you know one of those special forces in some Germanic division, the truth never uncovered, so the claim remained just on the level of a scuttlebutt.
Topy was tall, slim and a dryish of man, still one find him sinewy like a leather nail, and the age - it was hard to say anything about it.
He didn't like Englishmen and call them ' limeyjusers'.

Topy was a daunting officer and he has his customary way to fall his look right at eyes of a deck boy and to the ordinary seaman with his grey watery eyes and could announce without a warning: " Do I Kill you now, or kill I you later?"
On one evening, before my Nightwatch was to turn, at seven o' clock, we were sitting in the cabin of the able body seaman named Bylon, there were some drinking and the other sailors present.
Topy came down to the aft quarter and told me having taken down the Flag because there was raining outside and brought it to me to haul it up in the next morning.
Bylon who have taken some Dutch courage now greeted the Chief mate by asking the chief to show his armpit to make sure of the tattoo of the blood group which was the identification of the SS soldiers.
The answer came with fury, The Chief hit the able body seaman with the wet flag and the dog fighting began, filling the small cabin with waving hands and kicking legs, The officer caps was wiped off from Topy's head, I picked it up from floor, and didn't know where to put it, I put it on my head.

The second mate was a native of Holyland and hailed from a coastal village where the coastal inhabitant had their tradition for sheep. We could see every day the second mate coming out of his cabin wearing sheepskin and rubber galosh, there was very little officer look in his outfit so he was called among the sailors as ' sheepskin'. If Topy was Wulf, the second mate was sheep. he was humble, old and small, he didn't dare wear the officer cap labelled by the arm of the company, sometimes when he had got Dutch courage enough to wear his cap he was a changed person. he could come out from his cabin on the boat deck and descend into the crew quarter a half flask of whisky in his pocket-insisting that the crew should call him Sir.


 
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emsr2d2

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Please tell us the author of this bizarre text.
 

Humbertti

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The author is humbertti
 

emsr2d2

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I hope you didn't take offence at my first question, Humbertti. I readily admit that I only skimmed the main body of the text because once I'd seen the misspelt thread title and the two misspellings in the title of the piece, I assumed it had been written by some "out there" writer who thought that using his/her own spellings and style would pique readers' interest.
I glanced at the bottom and saw that there was no source/author listed and immediately went to writing my own post.

I echo all of Piscean's comments.
 

Humbertti

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It depends on how the sentences are interpreted.I well understand that using such as usage- it goes beyond apprehension.
 

Tdol

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Dutch courage is the lack of fear caused by drinking plenty of alcohol.
 

Humbertti

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I cannot but wonder how narrow is the boat your stand on. a word has so many ways to go
 
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emsr2d2

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Humbertti

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Why you do not try to find some average Jone to help you
 
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emsr2d2

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Humbertti, please explain your last couple of posts. They seem to have nothing to do with your original post. This thread appears to be going nowhere and is in danger of being closed.
 

Tdol

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Are you really from Fiji, or Finland?
 

Humbertti

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You ask, what is Joe? You have to know, you are the educator, not me.
Joe is a name of a man and in this connection, it is a common sailor.
and by old maritime usage 'lime juicer is an English sailor.

 

Humbertti

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sNot worry up there, you are not the only one who has the problem to understand, “A lot of native speakers are happy that English has become the world’s global language. They feel they don’t have to spend time learning another language,” says Chong. “But… often you have a boardroom full of people from different countries communicating in English and all understanding each other and then suddenly the American or Brit walks into the room and nobody can understand them.”
 

Charlie Bernstein

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I cannot but wonder how narrow the boat is you stand on. A word has so many ways to go.
The American jazz genius Charlie Parker said: "Master your instrument, master the music, and then forget all that and just play."

Before you can write meaningful English nonesense, you have to master the language. Let's take your title: "The Wulf and the cheep."

It looks like a play on "The Wolf and the Sheep." But why Wulf instead of Wolf? Why a small c for cheep? Why cheep instead of sheep or cheap?

Or how about your subject line? Why the? Why no capital D for dutch? Why gourage instead of courage (or gorge or garage)?

Yes, a word can go in lots of directions. But it's not clear that you have a direction. It's fine to take liberties, but there's no apparent reason for what you've done. What's your point?
 
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Charlie Bernstein

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You ask, what is Joe? You have to know, you are the educator, not me.
Joe is a name of a man and in this connection, it is a common sailor.
and by old maritime usage 'lime juicer is an English sailor.

You didn't write lime juicer, you wrote something garbled. Likewise, Jone isn't the same as Joe.

Again, James Joyce had a purpose to his strange writing in Finnegan's Wake. Lewis Carol had a purpose when he wrote Jabberwocky. It would simply help if you explained what your purpose is here.
 

emsr2d2

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More than imminent.
 
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