The equivalent of the slang

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sky753

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Hello Everyone, :)

In our area, there is a slang expression that someone is very "Kua", which means he is obsecene and often makes some offensive jokes or remarks related to sex.
I would like to know the equivalent of the expression in English?

Regards

Richard:)
 
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sky753

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Hello Everyone, :)

In our area, there is a slang expression that someone is very "Kua", which means he is obsecene and often makes some offensive jokes remarks related to sex.
I would like to know the equivalent of the expression in English?

Regards

Richard:)
 

Horsa

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I can't immediately think of a slang expression. Most people would probably say the person in question was either dirty-minded or crude. :)
 

vil

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Hi sky753,

I think that the equivalent of the expression in question is:

ribald = (a) characterized by or indulging in vulgar, lewd humor.

(n) a vulgar, lewdly funny person.

(slang) raunchy obscene, lewd or vulgar

Regards.


V.
 

Batfink

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Hi sky753,

I think that the equivalent of the expression in question is:

ribald = (a) characterized by or indulging in vulgar, lewd humor.

(n) a vulgar, lewdly funny person.

(slang) raunchy obscene, lewd or vulgar

Regards.


V.

I have never heard of that word in speech. I have read the word and know of its meaning. But never heard it.
 

vil

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Hi sky753,

There are further definition from other more reliable sources (Longman Dictionary, Word online and Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary)

ribald
ribald remarks or jokes are humorous, rude, and about sex:
a ribald remark
ribald humour

ribald (a) = humorously vulgar

ribald (n) =A ribald person; someone who uses vulgar and offensive language

ribald /'ribld/ adj. (of a person) using indecent or irreverent language or humour (of language, laughter etc.) coarse; mocking: ribald jests/songs,

(n) person who uses ribal language
ribaldry ?-dri/ (n) ribaldry language: coarse jesting

Regards.

V.
 
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sky753

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I have never heard of that word in speech. I have read the word and know of its meaning. But never heard it.

If the word has seldom been heard by native speakers, there is not much point discussing it here. Maybe there is no equivalant for "KUA" in oral English! Anyway hope to get more response here!:)

Thanks

SKY
:)
 

sky753

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Hi sky753,

There are further definition from other more reliable sources (Longman Dictionary, Word online and Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary)

ribald
ribald remarks or jokes are humorous, rude, and about sex:
a ribald remark
ribald humour

ribald (a) = humorously vulgar

ribald (n) =A ribald person; someone who uses vulgar and offensive language

ribald /'ribld/ adj. (of a person) using indecent or irreverent language or humour (of language, laughter etc.) coarse; mocking: ribald jests/songs,

(n) person who uses ribal language
ribaldry ?-dri/ (n) ribaldry language: coarse jesting

Regards.

V.

:up:

From your definition, ribald is the closest to "kua" in meaning. I would just likt to know here whether ribald is commonly used in spoken English? Hope teachers can give me the confirmation?

Regards

Sky:)
 

sky753

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You could say he is a "boor" .

:)Then how is "rebold" used? Is it a formal vocabulary or only seen in written English or a old-fashioned vocabulary? I would like to know its frequency ?:)
 

vil

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Dear sky753,

That is really funny. I’m not a NES and I’m studying English for a few years but I couldn’t helping wondering of the pompous self-confidence of the some NES. .If the “omniscient” NES really and truly go on with holding their own that the term “ribald” is unknown in English world, then it is most likely that the following sentences have not an English sounding but are my literal translation of mandarin (The official national standard spoken language of China, which is based on the principal dialect spoken in and around Beijing. Also called Guoyu).

…giving rise to discussion and comment --; informed, aggressive, sour, ribald and otherwise.
by everyday physical experience rather than separate from it, revered for its danger yet ribald and jolly, both everyday and sacramental.
The only hint at the effects of nervous strain came in a ribald verse current among the trainees, which he quoted to me:
.. many of the peasants took derisive and ribald names.
After a few more minutes of ribald banter on our part we were startled by a flash to starboard and an explosion
…and failed to finish, creeping from the track with the ribald comments of the crowd in their ears!
…of his beastly brutish mouth, a shameful, shameless, unreasonable, railing ribald ".
He made frank, often ribald remarks about other people, especially fellow-writers and intellectuals, and he was scathing about..
The only difference between this, the twentieth film in the ribald comedy series and the first instalment is that the key members of the cast are….
His tale may represent what we might like to believe such a character's ribald attitudes towards women, towards his fellow men, and towards conventional morality would predictably
The more the men whistled, the more ribald their remarks, the faster she walked; but the faster she walked,
For the next hour we silently suffered their ribald comments and downright abuse.
many of whom expressed their appreciation in appropriately ribald terms.
Some raucous laughter followed the ribald remark.
He got drunk; he was the sort, his ribald jokes, drinks for everyone.
Vologsky shunned the ribald laughter of his fellows as they boasted about their sexual conquests.
Now I give you three guesses who comes next," there followed ribald suggestions from different parts of the hall. As the hubbub subsided he cried,
Whereas all else had been a matter of pleasantries, he was ribald .
Mickey Aronson replied, delighted at the ribald laughter that greeted his witticism.
…that he, straight from church, should be swamped by this ribald , vulgar, beer-reeking mob reeling out from their godless pleasures.
Her images of that horde of ribald workmen looked positively endearing next to this man.
To the accompaniment of a chorus of ribald shouts and cat-calls, Seb weaved his way beyond the lights of the camp.
McEllhoney laughed and made the expected ribald comment.
Someone cheered, and there were ribald comments.
Americans appear to have no sense of the Gallic tradition of ribald humour that goes back to Rabelais.
They continue their ribald banter, and Peter stage-whispers to her, "It's disgusting.
I was impressed with this ribald inter-office banter.

Regards.

V.
 

Anglika

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Dear sky753,

That is really funny. I’m not a NES and I’m studying English for a few years but I couldn’t helping wondering of the pompous self-confidence of the some NES. .If the “omniscient” NES really and truly go on with holding their own that the term “ribald” is unknown in English world, then it is most likely that the following sentences have not an English sounding but are my literal translation of mandarin (The official national standard spoken language of China, which is based on the principal dialect spoken in and around Beijing. Also called Guoyu).


V.

I don't know where this idea came from:shock: The world is middle English: c.1240, "a rogue, ruffian, rascall, scoundrell, varlet, filthie fellow" [Cotgrave], from O.Fr. ribalt, of uncertain origin, perhaps from riber "be wanton, sleep around," from a Gmc. source (cf. O.H.G. riban "be wanton," lit. "to rub," possibly from the common euphemistic use of "rub" words to mean "have sex"), from P.Gmc. *wribanan, from PIE base *wer- "to turn, bend" The adjectice is attested from 1500, from the noun. Ribaldry is recorded from c.1300.

It is a word an educated person might use, but it is not what I would regard as one in common use.
 

vil

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Hi sky753,

Probably many not adequate educated NES have preference for the following rather simple expressions as: loose talker, cynic, misanthrope, dirty fellow, base/mean person, blackguard, scoundrel, rogue, villain, scamp, dirty, scurrilous/obscene fellow, rake, libertine, profligate but I insist that the term “ribald” corresponds exactly to the original question in the sky753’s post at the beginning of the present thread.

Regards.

V.
 

Anglika

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Only if used as part of a phrase. Yes, you could say that someone is a ribald fellow/guy - but it really is not a common term and would be regarded as somewhat overblown.

Many of the terms you give are perfectly good, but rarely found in modern speech. If the question is what would be a similar term to the Chinese one used in common speech, then really "boor" is about the only one I can think of.
 

Clare James

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In response to Vil's comments, from my reading, I think that the word 'ribald' has a slightly antiquated feel to it. It's often used in eighteenth and nineteenth century literature. It's not commonly used in spoken English. The register is a little formal. It's often used to describe the writing of Rabelais or some of the ruder speeches of Shakespeare's comic characters. I'd say that for chatting with friends down the pub, this wouldn't be quite the right word to use. It's all about register and what you want to do with the word.

Other idiomatic expressions to describe the kind of person who keeps on making dirty jokes is 'He's got a one track mind'. This kind of person is really annoying, aren't they?
 

sky753

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In response to Vil's comments, from my reading, I think that the word 'ribald' has a slightly antiquated feel to it. It's often used in eighteenth and nineteenth century literature. It's not commonly used in spoken English. The register is a little formal. It's often used to describe the writing of Rabelais or some of the ruder speeches of Shakespeare's comic characters. I'd say that for chatting with friends down the pub, this wouldn't be quite the right word to use. It's all about register and what you want to do with the word.

Other idiomatic expressions to describe the kind of person who keeps on making dirty jokes is 'He's got a one track mind'. This kind of person is really annoying, aren't they?

That is the real problem. Huge numbers of non native speakers ,including me, may be spending time leaning and reciting some old expressions, phrases, vocabularies, which we don't know, similar to the one we are talking about! It is not worthy , in my opinion! Of couse, I don't mean that such expressions shouldn't be mastered! My opinion is that learners should touch and learn the common language, which is easier and can also spice up their intrests! :) And I have antoher question is it proper for me to use 'spice up ' here! Is it also sort of sex related phrase?:-?

Regards

Sky
 
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Anglika

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Not in the usual usage! Like so many phrases, it may take on that connotation by context and implication. :cool:
 

sky753

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Hi sky753,

Probably many not adequate educated NES have preference for the following rather simple expressions as: loose talker, cynic, misanthrope, dirty fellow, base/mean person, blackguard, scoundrel, rogue, villain, scamp, dirty, scurrilous/obscene fellow, rake, libertine, profligate but I insist that the term “ribald” corresponds exactly to the original question in the sky753’s post at the beginning of the present thread.

Regards.

V.

Yes, you are quite right! In terms of which expression is close to the meaning of Kua, ribald is the best!:) Boor, from longman and cambridge dictionary , doesn't appear to be the equivalent of Kua. However, natives may prefer Boor as ribald is very old. Without living in English speaking countries, we couldn't appreciate the essence!:)
 
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