"the giggle" and "Grandpa Irving"

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belcebuonline

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Mar 21, 2008
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Hello:

first time here, and glad to talk to you. I'm just doing a new subtitling of Pulp Fiction into Spanish and have a doubt about the use of "giggle" in the following expression:

"Robbing banks ain't the giggle it used to be"

The point is if this word is used in standard contexts by a majority of people, or if it is restricted to some childish way of talking - or other.

Also in Pulp Fiction, they refer to "Granpa Irving", as a prototype of Jew wich owns a store and s"its all day behind the couter with a gun in his hands". Could anyone tell me the origins, reasons or width of use of this expression?


Thank you very much for your help!
 

banderas

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"Robbing banks ain't the giggle it used to be"

As I know this expression is used by many native speakers in general.
 

Ouisch

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Hello:

first time here, and glad to talk to you. I'm just doing a new subtitling of Pulp Fiction into Spanish and have a doubt about the use of "giggle" in the following expression:

"Robbing banks ain't the giggle it used to be"

The point is if this word is used in standard contexts by a majority of people, or if it is restricted to some childish way of talking - or other.​


Although the meaning is easily understood by most native speakers, the actual phrase is not common usage.

Also in Pulp Fiction, they refer to "Granpa Irving", as a prototype of Jew wich owns a store and s"its all day behind the couter with a gun in his hands". Could anyone tell me the origins, reasons or width of use of this expression?

Sadly, this is just one unfortunate stereotype that has perpetuated about not only Jewish people, but several other ethnic groups. In the scenario mentioned above, the same quotation could be applied to, say, Korean or Arabic business owners - those small stores located in what are considered dangerous neighborhoods that are run by a married couple (depending upon the area, the couple might be Jewish, Yemeni, Iranian, Korean, Hmong, etc.). They know they are in a high-crime area and often work behind bullet-proof glass or have a gun or baseball bat (or other defensive weapon) within arm's reach while working behind the counter.

In high-crime areas in the US, very few "chain" stores will open up a business - the insurance liability is too costly. So all you'll find are small "Mom and Pop" stores operated by individuals who have emigrated from abroad, saved their money and purchased their own business.​
 
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