The Passion=Suffering

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Etymology of Passion from Merriam-Webster
Link:
http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary?book=Dictionary&va=passion

I didn’t realize that “passion” has the meaning of suffering after reading a report by on-line news.

Link: http://hk.news.yahoo.com/040320/12/y6p0.html
It’s in Chinese, however I am trying to put in rudimentary English.

The word of Passion is easily related to romantic, ardour, but in fact it also means suffering, humble, beyond the love of human beings. The story begins from a farm. After Jesus and his twelve disciples have eaten the last dinner, Peter, Jacob and John follow Jesus to the farm to pray. Jesus is resisting the temptation of the Satan, but He is betrayed by Judas and is brought back to Jerusalem for trying.

I smile that lovers love in passion, when love is torn. One side or both sides are in suffering. Latin was the most sage people!

P.S. Sir Ronbee, Thank you for your compliment which I am not deserving on the other thread. And MikeNewYork too
 

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Here is what I found at Merriam-Webster online:
  • Main Entry: pas·sion
    Pronunciation: 'pa-sh&n
    Function: noun
    Etymology: Middle English, from Old French, from Late Latin passion-, passio suffering, being acted upon, from Latin pati to suffer -- more at PATIENT
    1 often capitalized a : the sufferings of Christ between the night of the Last Supper and his death b : an oratorio based on a gospel narrative of the Passion
    http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary?book=Dictionary&va=passion

Interesting, huh?

:)
 
H

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Hi Sir Ronbee:

From my experiences, to love a person passionately can make you in an agony!
That is the passion! C’est la vie! (That is life!)
When Adam by the encouragement of Eve ate the forbidden apple, human beings begins to suffer – that says from the Bible.

I sigh and sigh and sigh for nothing!
 

Tdol

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The use of passion in with this meaning is largely confined to religious contexts. ;-)
 

MikeNewYork

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Hong Kong Chinese said:
Etymology of Passion from Merriam-Webster
Link:
http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary?book=Dictionary&va=passion

I didn’t realize that “passion” has the meaning of suffering after reading a report by on-line news.

Link: http://hk.news.yahoo.com/040320/12/y6p0.html
It’s in Chinese, however I am trying to put in rudimentary English.

The word of Passion is easily related to romantic, ardour, but in fact it also means suffering, humble, beyond the love of human beings. The story begins from a farm. After Jesus and his twelve disciples have eaten the last dinner, Peter, Jacob and John follow Jesus to the farm to pray. Jesus is resisting the temptation of the Satan, but He is betrayed by Judas and is brought back to Jerusalem for trying.

I smile that lovers love in passion, when love is torn. One side or both sides are in suffering. Latin was the most sage people!

P.S. Sir Ronbee, Thank you for your compliment which I am not deserving on the other thread. And MikeNewYork too

As you have discovered, the word "passion" has several meanings. It even has one that is archaic (no longer used) that is a direct opposite of one of its current meanings. When "passion" is applied to the suffering of Jesus, it is usually capitalized.

8 entries found for passion.
pas·sion ( P ) Pronunciation Key (pshn)
n.
1. A powerful emotion, such as love, joy, hatred, or anger.

2. Ardent love.
3. a. Strong sexual desire; lust.
b. The object of such love or desire.

4. a. Boundless enthusiasm: His skills as a player don't quite match his passion for the game.
b. The object of such enthusiasm: Soccer is her passion.
5. An abandoned display of emotion, especially of anger: He's been known to fly into a passion without warning.
6. Passion
a.The sufferings of Jesus in the period following the Last Supper and including the Crucifixion, as related in the New Testament.
b. A narrative, musical setting, or pictorial representation of Jesus's sufferings.
7. Archaic. Martyrdom.
8. Archaic. Passivity.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
[Middle English, from Old French, from Medieval Latin passi, passin-, sufferings of Jesus or a martyr, from Late Latin, physical suffering, martyrdom, sinful desire, from Latin, an undergoing, from passus, past participle of pat, to suffer. See p(i)- in Indo-European Roots.]
 
H

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Thank you MikeNewYork for your detailed explanation on ‘passion’.

I have more English words collected relating to patir (Latin).
Patir =>pass/pati – to suffer

patience, patient, passible, passive, compassion, compatible

Compatible – The new hardware is not compatible to the computer, therefore the computer user suffers.
 

MikeNewYork

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Hong Kong Chinese said:
Thank you MikeNewYork for your detailed explanation on ‘passion’.

I have more English words collected relating to patir (Latin).
Patir =>pass/pati – to suffer

patience, patient, passible, passive, compassion, compatible

Compatible – The new hardware is not compatible to the computer, therefore the computer user suffers.

You're welcome. If you are interested in etymology, particularly of English words with Latin roots, you can follw the link I will post to a great web site. It allows you to download a small program with extensive information.

http://ablemedia.com/ctcweb/showcase/roots.html

Enjoy! :D
 
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eric2004

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Hmm, I'm a little amazed why <Passion of the Christ> is able to get such a fantastic performance in Box office?
 

Tdol

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eric2004 said:
Hmm, I'm a little amazed why <Passion of the Christ> is able to get such a fantastic performance in Box office?

There has been huge publicity for it. I doubt that it will have the same box office success in the UK as we are much less religious than the USA. ;-)
 
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eric2004

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So does it mean I must believe in something before I'm involved in western society?

I thought passion is love. Am I wrong? 5555.
 

Tdol

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Passion is love and love often involves a spot of hardship. ;-)
 

RonBee

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eric2004 said:
So does it mean I must believe in something before I'm involved in western society?

No, you don't have to believe in anything in particular. You don't have to be anything in particular. You can do what you want.

eric2004 said:
I thought passion is love. Am I wrong? 5555.

Yes, you are wrong. Passion is any strong feeling. If you are talking about the passion of the Christ, however, it refers to suffering.

(Say: "I thought passion was love.")

:)
 

Tdol

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I have it on my machine and it is in the links database now. ;-)
 

MikeNewYork

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tdol said:
I have it on my machine and it is in the links database now. ;-)

Great. One thing I like is it lists words that are not derived from the stems even though they appear to be so derived. :wink:
 
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