"the trouble of moving"

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Odessa Dawn

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You cannot have your cake and eat it (too).
Prov. You cannot enjoy two desirable things at the same time. Jill: There's an apartment across the street from me, much bigger and prettier than mine, and it even costs less. I'd really like to rent it—but I don't want to go to the trouble of moving. Jane: You can't have your cake and eat it too. Fred: I want to lose weight, but I'm not willing to change the way I eat. Alan: You can't have your cake and eat it.
You cannot have your cake and eat it - Idioms - by the Free Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia.

Some people suffer from instability because they have no homes, and I feel for them. Also, I haven’t got home thus far, and I always live moving from one place (flat/apartment) to another. If I want to express my suffering from this difficult situation, can I say:"I can't stand moving any more" OR "Moving crushed me to the point of death?" Do we have other common expressions in English other than the underlined one?

Thank you.

 

5jj

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. If I want to express my suffering from this difficult situation, can I say:"I can't stand moving any more"
We are more likely to say, "I can't stand/face the thought of moving any more".
OR "Moving crushed me to the point of death?"
No.I suppose "Moving almost killed me" is possible.
 
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