The Usage of the Verb 'To Lean'.

Status
Not open for further replies.
1

1044070

Guest
Hello,

I thank you all in advance for taking the time to read this question and also apologise for such a question.

I have recently seen a sign that said: 'Do not lean anything on this wall', & for some reason, it did not sound right to me. I would probably write: 'Do not make anything lean on this wall'. I find it strange that something can 'lean' by itself, when I feel that it needs some sort of 'will' or an action to make something 'lean'. When you say 'Do not lean on this wall', it indicates that 'you' should not 'lean' on the wall, and not something to lean against it?

Sorry for this silly question, but I would truly appreciate it if you could tell me: 'you are mad' and / or if it the above sign is correct, I would be grateful, if someone could clarify this mystery of mine....

Thank you very much,

1044070.
 
S

Susie Smith

Guest
1044070 said:
Hello,

I thank you all in advance for taking the time to read this question and also apologise for such a question.

I have recently seen a sign that said: 'Do not lean anything on this wall', & for some reason, it did not sound right to me. I would probably write: 'Do not make anything lean on this wall'. I find it strange that something can 'lean' by itself, when I feel that it needs some sort of 'will' or an action to make something 'lean'. When you say 'Do not lean on this wall', it indicates that 'you' should not 'lean' on the wall, and not something to lean against it?

Sorry for this silly question, but I would truly appreciate it if you could tell me: 'you are mad' and / or if it the above sign is correct, I would be grateful, if someone could clarify this mystery of mine....

Thank you very much,

1044070.

Lean can be either transitive or intransitive.

You can lean against/on a wall or lean on somebody. This means that your body is resting against a wall or another person in an inclined position.

You can also lean something against/on a wall. e.g. I leaned a ladder against the wall. This means that you rested the upper end of the ladder on the wall.

Hope this helps.
:)
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
Staff member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
Japan
If a tree is not straight, you can simply say it 'leans' without any further reference, or, better, take the Leaning Tower of Pisa.;-)
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top