The word Dad and Mom

Status
Not open for further replies.
A

Anonymous

Guest
I'm working on my first book,an autobiography . I wanted to make sure when do I use capital letters with there words?
 

MikeNewYork

VIP Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Academic
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
Lazycat said:
I'm working on my first book,an autobiography . I wanted to make sure when do I use capital letters with there words?

If you use those words as a substitute for their names, capitalize the words; if you are referring to them as relatives, don't capitalize.

My mom and dad were great people.

Then Mom came in and said hello to my friends.

I'm home, Dad.

My dad is in the living room.
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
Staff member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
Japan
And 'mum' is a more common spelling in BE. ;-)
 

shane

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 17, 2003
Member Type
Student or Learner
My mum always signs off in her letters using Mom. I guess she watches too much American television. ;)
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
Staff member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
Japan
Many do, but I'd say the majority spell it with a 'u'. ;-)
 

MikeNewYork

VIP Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Academic
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
tdol said:
Many do, but I'd say the majority spell it with a 'u'. ;-)

Do Brits spell "mother" as "muther"? :roll:
 

Dianelys

Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2003
MikeNewYork said:
tdol said:
Many do, but I'd say the majority spell it with a 'u'. ;-)

Do Brits spell "mother" as "muther"? :roll:

‘Mum’ is the short form of ‘Mummy’*. That’s probably a phonetic transcription of the Italian word ‘mamma’ which means ‘mother’. I suppose that it is spelt ‘mum’ in order to be, or because it is pronounced /mʌm/.

*mummy = mother, not the Egyptian mummy :!:

:roll: :) :D
 

MikeNewYork

VIP Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Academic
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
Dianelys said:
MikeNewYork said:
tdol said:
Many do, but I'd say the majority spell it with a 'u'. ;-)

Do Brits spell "mother" as "muther"? :roll:

‘Mum’ is the short form of ‘Mummy’*. That’s probably a phonetic transcription of the Italian word ‘mamma’ which means ‘mother’. I suppose that it is spelt ‘mum’ in order to be, or because it is pronounced /mʌm/.

*mummy = mother, not the Egyptian mummy :!:

:roll: :) :D

Why would British people use a phonetic Italian translation, if, indeed, that is what it is? :roll:
 

RonBee

Moderator
Joined
Feb 9, 2003
Member Type
Other
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
May I make a suggestion or two?

Lazycat said:
I'm working on my first book,an autobiography . I wanted to make sure when do I use capital letters with there words?

In the second sentence, use want, not wanted. After all, you are talking about the present, not the past. Also, if you are talking about mom and dad use those words. (The phrase there words is a distinctly unlikely construction.)

:)
 
A

Android

Guest
Lazycat said:
I'm working on my first book,an autobiography . I wanted to make sure when do I use capital letters with there words?
I think what matters is what those words mean to you. But if you use it with the capital once, you have to use it all the time - same with Fatherland or fatherland, if you know what I mean :)
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top