there has been a move to abolish laws which were deemed to be too harsh or strict.

ambitious-girl

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Could you please check these sentence?

In recent years, there has been a move to abolish laws which were deemed to be too harsh or strict.
In recent years, there has been a move to abolishing laws which were deemed to be too harsh or strict.
In recent years, there has been a move towards abolishing laws which were deemed to be too harsh or strict.

Does "move" mean "PROGRESS/CHANGE a change, especially one which improves a situation "?
https://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/move
 

ambitious-girl

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Thank you RobertJ.
So, it seems that in the sentence #1 "to" have the same meaning as "in order to", while in the sentence #2, "to" acts as a preposition. As a result, both forms are acceptable.
 

yi-ing

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In recent years there has been a move to abolish laws which were deemed to be too harsh or strict.
May I ask why do the author use "past tense"?
It seems that those laws are about to abolish. They has not yet abolished.
 

emsr2d2

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May I ask why [STRIKE]do[/STRIKE] the author used the (no quotation marks here) past tense? (no quotation marks before the question mark)
It seems that those laws are about to be abolished. They [STRIKE]has[/STRIKE] have not yet been abolished.

See my corrections above.

The past tense was used because the laws had been deemed to be too harsh or strict before the move to abolish them was made.
 
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