There's no cuts

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Winwin2011

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The following dialogues are from a moive:

Mother: Baby. What happened to your face. How did you get these cuts. Who did this to you?
Daughter: Did what?
Mother: The cuts on your face.
Daughter: There's no cuts.

If we refer to a countable noun, we usually use "There are no" with a plural noun. I am wondering if native speakers would say "There's no cuts" in spoken English? For sake of convenience, I am supposed native speakers would say There's no... at the beginning without thinking about whether the subsequent noun is countable or uncountable. Am I correct?

Thanks.
 
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Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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I am wondering if native speakers would say "There's no cuts" in spoken English? For sake of convenience, I am supposed native speakers would say There's no... at the beginning without thinking about whether the subsequent noun is countable or uncountable. Am I correct?

It's not uncommon in colloquial spoken English, at least in British English. I think it's more a question of flow rather than not thinking. You will hear things like There's two things I have to say, where there's no question of not thinking- it's easier to say.
 
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