[Grammar] to be going somewhere vs. to be going to (go)

Augustine06

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Dear Teachers,

Could you please explain in simple words what the following question means?

Who was Mr. Smith going to a new house with?

Does it mean that Mr. Smith was heading to a new house with someone (and we want to know who was that person)?

OR

Does it mean that Mr. Smith was going to visit a new house with someone (and we want to know who was that person)?

I'm having an argument with a person who clearly confuses the verb "to go" in its continuous form, expressing a simple movement towards something and the form "to be going to (go)" expressing a planned action.
Please clarify.

Thanks a lot in advance for your help!
 
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teechar

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It can only mean the former, because the latter would require another verb after "going", which your sentence doesn't have.
By the way, it's "visit".
 

Augustine06

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Thank you so much, teechar!
And thank you for correcting my typo. :)
 

emsr2d2

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[STRIKE]Dear teachers,[/STRIKE] Unnecessarily formal. Just use "Hello".

Could you please explain in simple words what [STRIKE]does[/STRIKE] the following question means?

See above.
 
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