to be noticed before.

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aysaa

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Hi,

- I just want to be noticed before.

- I just want to have noticed before.

In my opinion, the second sentence better, but I would like to ask if the first one is OK with before or not.

Thanks.
 

bhaisahab

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Hi,

- I just want to be noticed before.

- I just want to have noticed before.

In my opinion, the second sentence better, but I would like to ask if the first one is OK with before or not.

Thanks.

Neither one makes sense as a stand alone sentence. Also, "to be noticed" and "to have noticed", mean different things.
 

aysaa

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Sorry, it would be '- I just want to have been noticed before.'

It may make no sense, but I would like to learn which one (to be or to have been) as infinitives with 'before'.

Thanks.
 

emsr2d2

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Before what?
 

aysaa

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-You seem to have missed the years when the Euro was/is overvalued.

-You seem to have lost everthing after your father died/dies.

OK, now I think I have got what I want to utter. Must I use ''the simple present'' or ''past tense'' after an adverb such as 'when, after' when we use 'seem/appear to have done' together with it?

Thanks.
 

5jj

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Must I use ''the simple present'' or ''past tense'' after an adverb such as 'when, after' when we use 'seem/appear to have done' together with it?

Thanks.
Stop trying to find absolute rules and use a bit of common sense.

You seem to have missed the (past) years when the Euro was devalued (past).
You seem to have missed the years (up to and including the present) when the Euro has been devalued.
You seem to have lost everything after your father died (if he's dead, then he died in the past).
 
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