To be out on your ear

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Casiopea

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Francois said:
Camridge dict said:
to be forced to leave a job or place, especially because you have done something wrong
Where does this expression come from?

FRC

Probably from parents, store owners, and the bartender. :wink:

Literally: To be out (the door) on one's ear

Someone has taken you by the ear and has forced you out the door because they don't want you there. :D

Figuratively: To be out (the door) on one's ear

When you don't have a home or a job to go into.

All the best,
 

Francois

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Jun 15, 2004
TY.

"After blowing yet another contract, I was out on my ear"
"If you barf on the bouncer, you'll be thrown out on your ear".

Correct?

FRC
 

Casiopea

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Francois said:
TY.

"After blowing yet another contract, I was out on my ear"
"If you barf on the bouncer, you'll be thrown out on your ear".

Correct?

FRC

Great examples. :D Both refer to being thrown/tossed out. :cry:
 

Tdol

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Barfing on bouncers is definitely not recommended, not unless you're built like a gorilla. :lol:
 

Tdol

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I'm not so I try not to. ;-)
 
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