to be reverse bartered

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magdalena

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What does to be reverse bartered mean?
 

vil

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Attention: I'm not a teacher.

Hi Magdalena,

There are an hypothetical sentence concerning the matter in question and a brief explanation of the term “barter”.

For example, he managed to buy a whole new outfit for 100Y when the original cost had been 300Y. Not too bad but the idiot was out on the razz the night I wasn't and somehow reverse bartered. He bought a woolen Communist great coat from a tiny Chinese bouncer for 30 US Dollars when the guy had already said he wanted 200Y for it. Therefore he paid 40Y more than he needed to. Mats was a quirky guy though so it fit well.

barter = trade by the direct exchange of goods for other goods without using money or other medium of exchange.

to barter (v) = to trade (goods or services) without the exchange of money.

reverse = moving, acting, or organized in a manner contrary to the usual.

An example of a barter arrangement would be if someone built a fence for a cattle farmer in exchange for food. Rather than the farmer paying the builder, say, $1,000 for the fence, he would give the builder a similar value in beef.

Regards.

V.
 

Snowcake

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Hi Vil and the others,

there could be a problem with the spelling. There is a word 'battered'.
to batter is similiar to 'hit someone' or 'lay a hand on someone'.

Maybe I'm totally wrong here and there is no typo in Magadalena's question. :?:

However, I thought it was worth mentioning.

Best Regards and have a nice Sunday,
Snowcake
 
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BobK

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Hi Vil and the others,

there could be a problem with the spelling. There is a word 'battered'.
to batter is similiar to 'hit someone' or 'lay a hand on someone'.

Maybe I'm totally wrong here and there is no typo in Magadalena's question. :?:

However, I thought it was worth mentioning.

Best Regards and have a nice Sunday,
Snowcake

This is the sort of typo that happens a lot on the Internet, but Vil's example shows a perfectly plausible meaning. So, as Anglika said, we need context (and as Grévisse said 'Les mots ne'existent pas' ;-)).

b
 

Snowcake

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You're right. That's why I tried to point out that there could be a typo (because there was no context given by magdalena). I entirely agree with Vil. I've refered to Anglika's response in my first post, but obviously my answer wasn't clear enough.
Sorry, I didn't mean to confuse anyone or put Vil's answer into question. :oops: I only wanted to show that there could be another meaning (with regard to a typo) Embarrassing. Sorry.

What do you mean by this quotation? (The words don't exist)?

Snowcake
 

BobK

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Grévisse (a French grammarian often quoted by my French master) meant that words don't have a separate existence (floating around somewhere in the ether ;-)), and that without context they are impossible to comment on.

b
 

Snowcake

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Thanks. :)

I should have known better. :roll:;-)

Snowcake
 

susiedqq

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Unless there is a context, this will remain a mystery. The term, reverse bartering, is seen in auctions, merchandising, swap meets and licensing agreements.
:roll:
 

BobK

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Unless there is a context, this will remain a mystery. The term, reverse bartering, is seen in auctions, merchandising, swap meets and licensing agreements.
:roll:
Who'da thunk it? To me, there seems to be an element of pleonasm in the phrase. "Barter" implies reciprocation, so what's the "reverse" doing? But if that's the way it is, that's the way it is. :up:;-)

b
 

magdalena

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somebody went to store wanting to see how haggling will work but the store offered her a huge discount first so she needn't have thought of haggling= she was reverse bartered. I think vil's explanation fits here well thanks to all of you:)
 
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