[Grammar] to can

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non_e_giusto

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So I learned that in English, to form the full infinitive of a verb, you have to write: to + verb. So for example: to play, to walk, to do, etc. However, I have never heard anybody say: "to can". You can say "to be able to", but "to can" sounds weird. What is going on there? Does the word "can" have a full infinitive? If not, why not? And are there more verbs like that?
 

SlickVic9000

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Unless you're talking about putting stuff into cans, then no. "To be able" is the only appropriate infinitive for "can" that I can think of.
 

5jj

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One of the distinguishing features of the modal verbs (can, could, may, might, must, shall, should, will and would) is that they have no infinitive form.
 

Barb_D

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Which is why it's important to distinguish the idea of "I can tomatoes" and "I can see Russia from my house."
 
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