to chide

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Carmenn

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=to tell somebody off when they have done something wrong
I don't understand this explanation, more exactly ''to tell somebody OFF'' :-?
 

engee30

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=to tell somebody off when they have done something wrong
I don't understand this explanation, more exactly ''to tell somebody OFF'' :-?

That means to speak angrily at someone because they have done something wrong.
;-)
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:turn-l:Bear in mind I'm not a teacher!:turn-l:
 

Casiopea

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In addition,

chide –verb (used with object)
1. to express disapproval of; scold; reproach: The principal chided the children for their thoughtless pranks.

2. to harass, nag, impel, or the like by chiding: She chided him into apologizing.

chide –verb (used without object)
3. to scold or reproach; find fault. [Does anyone have an example for this?]

intransitive senses : to speak out in angry or displeased rebuke
transitive senses : to voice disapproval to : reproach in a usually mild and constructive manner : scold

chide - Definitions from Dictionary.com
Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary: Search Results - Your gateway to all Britannica has to offer!
 

engee30

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In addition,... Additionally,... etc.

You doesn't seem to be 'additive free', Casiopea :lol: That's really helpful and 'nutritious' (compared to some foods I can get from my superstore!).
:-D
 

BobK

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You said 'In addition', Casi. Geddit ;-)

Was it you who were asking for an example? Here's one: 'When Peter limped home late, tired, and with his jacket torn, Mrs Rabbit gently chided him for going into Mr McGregor's garden - but she was too relieved to be really angry.'

b
PS
Beatrix Potter didn't write that; I did. But that use of 'chide' sounds rather Edwardian to me, and I wouldn't be surprised to find it in a Peter Rabbit story. Come to think of it, weren't the three little kittens who lost their mittens chided? Chidden?? (The verb's too obscure for me to worry too much about the participle ;-))
 

Casiopea

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You said 'In addition', Casi. Geddit ;-)
Nope. :oops:

BobK said:
Was it you who were asking for an example? Here's one: 'When Peter limped home late, tired, and with his jacket torn, Mrs Rabbit gently chided him for going into Mr McGregor's garden - but she was too relieved to be really angry.'
Ta, but I was wondering if anyone had an intransitive example:
chide –verb (used without object)
3. to scold or reproach; find fault.
[no example provided]


Isn't him an object here?
Ex: Mrs Rabbit gently chided him for going into Mr McGregor's garden

Also,
Ex: The three little kittens were chided.

The subject functions as the semantic object of the verb. That is, chided is still transitive, no?


I'm confused by what the dictionaries don't have to offer on the intransitive use of chide "(without an object)": not one example. :-?
 

BobK

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...
chide –verb (used without object)
3. to scold or reproach; find fault. [Does anyone have an example for this?]

intransitive senses : to speak out in angry or displeased rebuke
....
I didn't read this carefully, and assumed that 'find fault' was just missing a 'with'; because I expected it to be transitive. I suppose sometimes its object is elided:

'I don't mean to chide [you]. But don't you think that was a bit insensitive?'

But I agree with you that this dictionary definition looks a bit odd.

b
PS
I suppose this sort of transitive-but-with-an-omitted-object usage may occur in expressions like 'I know what you mean. She does tend to chide rather' - in which some people may detect an omitted object (one/you/people) and others may simply call it intransitive.
 

Casiopea

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I suppose this sort of transitive-but-with-an-omitted-object usage may occur in expressions like 'I know what you mean. She does tend to chide rather' - in which some people may detect an omitted object (one/you/people) and others may simply call it intransitive.
Good example. Thanks. :-D
 

Carmenn

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Pfiuuu...how many explanations...i'll have to give attention to each of them even tough it'll be a bit hard.:-D Thank you !
 
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