[Idiom] To live on sb.'s road

coolfool

Junior Member
Joined
Feb 26, 2009
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
Chinese
Home Country
China
Current Location
China
James Corden answers:
I have lots of contact with Jimmy Fallon. I love Jimmy Kimmel, and Conan O’Brien too. He lives on my road, or rather, I should say I live on his road.
From 20Q James Corden, p97, Playboy, Nov.-Dec. 2017

Unable to find the phrase on dictionaries.

Could anyone lend a hand with the above?

Extremely grateful.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

GoesStation

No Longer With Us
Joined
Dec 22, 2015
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
Or, in American English, on the same road.
 

Skrej

Key Member
Joined
May 11, 2015
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
It's not an idiom or set expression, it's just a literal sentence.

He's kind of joking when he says "rather I live on his road" - the idea being that the road belongs to the other person, instead of Cordon. Presumably either because the other person lived there first, or is more deemed somehow more important (or famous). I suppose since Cordon's from the UK, he could also be joking that the road belongs to the American.

Note that it's also slightly unclear if it's Kimmel, Fallon, or O'Brien that lives on the same road as Cordon. Presumably O'Brien since he was listed last.
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
Staff member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
Japan
It doesn't sound to me as having the idea of possession of the street- in BrE, we often use possessives with the road we live in. Cordon may be the most famous person in the street.
 

emsr2d2

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jul 28, 2009
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
UK
It's not an idiom or set expression, it's just a literal sentence.

He's kind of joking when he says "rather I live on his road" - the idea being that the road belongs to the other person, instead of Corden. Presumably either because the other person lived there first, or is more deemed somehow more important (or famous). I suppose since Corden's from the UK, he could also be joking that the road belongs to the American.

Note that it's also slightly unclear if it's Kimmel, Fallon, or O'Brien that lives on the same road as Corden. Presumably O'Brien since he was listed last.

It doesn't sound to me as having the idea of possession of the street- in BrE, we often use possessives with the road we live in. Corden may be the most famous person in the street.

Note the correct spelling of James Corde​n's surname. :)
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
Staff member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
Japan
He's obviously not that famous. ;-)
 

emsr2d2

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jul 28, 2009
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
UK
Over here he is! And now that he's got his own talk show in the US, he's even better known. Maybe he hasn't reached Laos yet.
 

coolfool

Junior Member
Joined
Feb 26, 2009
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
Chinese
Home Country
China
Current Location
China
I'm indebted to all of you for your help.

If Mr. Corden had simply written "He lives on my road." and no more, I'd have grasped its meaning at first glance. But when he was kidding, having added "..., or rather, I should say I live on his road.", it made me sort of confused about if I missed something else here. I know my place and daren't comment on whether or not he succeeded in having gilded the lily.

It's the most difficult part, I fear, for non-native English speakers, or English learners, living outside the English speaking world to figure out the real meaning of western jokes in some special circumstances.

Tip my hat to you all.
 
Top