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Taka

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In "an exciting game", "exciting" means "joy". In "an excited game", "excited" suggests something manic. Both usage of "exciting" and "excited" are acceptable, right?

But a sentence like "As soon as Michael Jordan came in, the game became excited." sounds weird to me. I don't know why, but it just sounds strange.

Why do you think it's weird? Or is such a sentence acceptable?
 

MikeNewYork

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Taka said:
In "an exciting game", "exciting" means "joy". In "an excited game", "excited" suggests something maniac. Both usage of "exciting" and "excited" are acceptable, right?

But a sentence like "As soon as Michael Jordan came in, the game became excited." sounds weird to me. I don't know why, but it just sounds strange.

Why do you think it's weird? Or is such a sentence acceptable?

No. In "an exciting game", "exciting" means "causing excitement". There is no "excited game" that I am aware of. When Jordan entered the game, the game became "exciting"; the crowd became "excited". Something must be able to feel excitement or it cannot be excited (in this context).
 

Taka

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MikeNewYork said:
No. In "an exciting game", "exciting" means "causing excitement".

Yes, that's what I wanted to say.

MikeNewYork said:
There is no "excited game" that I am aware of.

Are you sure? Can't you say, for example, "an excited conversation"? As far as I'm concerned, I've heard that kind of "excited".

FYI, check this out:

"I'm just trying to play a relaxed game," Miller said. "An excited game isn't the style that works up here and luckily for me, I'm more relaxed, not real flashy and flamboyant. I can let the game kind of come to me."

http://www.usatoday.com/sports/scores103/103016/20030116NHL--SANJOSE---0nr.htm

What do you think?
 

RonBee

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Taka said:
MikeNewYork said:
No. In "an exciting game", "exciting" means "causing excitement".

Yes, that's what I wanted to say.

MikeNewYork said:
There is no "excited game" that I am aware of.

Are you sure? Can't you say, for example, "an excited conversation"? As far as I'm concerned, I've heard that kind of "excited".

FYI, check this out:

"I'm just trying to play a relaxed game," Miller said. "An excited game isn't the style that works up here and luckily for me, I'm more relaxed, not real flashy and flamboyant. I can let the game kind of come to me."

http://www.usatoday.com/sports/scores103/103016/20030116NHL--SANJOSE---0nr.htm

What do you think?

An excited conversation would be one in which the participants are excited, not the conversation. As for "a relaxed game" or "an excited game", those terms refer to the way the game is played, not the game itself.

:)
 

MikeNewYork

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Taka said:
MikeNewYork said:
No. In "an exciting game", "exciting" means "causing excitement".

Yes, that's what I wanted to say.

MikeNewYork said:
There is no "excited game" that I am aware of.

Are you sure? Can't you say, for example, "an excited conversation"? As far as I'm concerned, I've heard that kind of "excited".

FYI, check this out:

"I'm just trying to play a relaxed game," Miller said. "An excited game isn't the style that works up here and luckily for me, I'm more relaxed, not real flashy and flamboyant. I can let the game kind of come to me."

http://www.usatoday.com/sports/scores103/103016/20030116NHL--SANJOSE---0nr.htm

What do you think?

These are examples of metaphorical language. An "excited" conversation is one in which the participants are excited. In that context, "exciting" wouldn't convey the appropriate meaning. But it is not really the conversation that is "excited".

In the second example, it is similar. He refers to o relaxed game as one in which the players are rather letharigic. An excited game is one in which the players are excited, more animated, more aggressive.
 

MikeNewYork

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RonBee said:
Taka said:
MikeNewYork said:
No. In "an exciting game", "exciting" means "causing excitement".

Yes, that's what I wanted to say.

MikeNewYork said:
There is no "excited game" that I am aware of.

Are you sure? Can't you say, for example, "an excited conversation"? As far as I'm concerned, I've heard that kind of "excited".

FYI, check this out:

"I'm just trying to play a relaxed game," Miller said. "An excited game isn't the style that works up here and luckily for me, I'm more relaxed, not real flashy and flamboyant. I can let the game kind of come to me."

http://www.usatoday.com/sports/scores103/103016/20030116NHL--SANJOSE---0nr.htm

What do you think?

An excited conversation would be one in which the participants are excited, not the conversation. As for "a relaxed game" or "an excited game", those terms refer to the way the game is played, not the game itself.

:)

GMTA! :wink:
 

Taka

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MikeNewYork said:
These are examples of metaphorical language. An "excited" conversation is one in which the participants are excited. In that context, "exciting" wouldn't convey the appropriate meaning. But it is not really the conversation that is "excited".

In the second example, it is similar. He refers to o relaxed game as one in which the players are rather letharigic. An excited game is one in which the players are excited, more animated, more aggressive.

I'm afraid I don't have a great mind, but I think alike. :lol:

Yes, I know they are metaphorical. But then, why can't "As soon as M. Jordan came in, the game became excited." be understood as a metaphor? I mean, I think there is a case where the players get excited, animated, once M.Jordan came in and kicks their a..., excuse me, butts.
 

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Taka said:
MikeNewYork said:
These are examples of metaphorical language. An "excited" conversation is one in which the participants are excited. In that context, "exciting" wouldn't convey the appropriate meaning. But it is not really the conversation that is "excited".

In the second example, it is similar. He refers to o relaxed game as one in which the players are rather letharigic. An excited game is one in which the players are excited, more animated, more aggressive.

I'm afraid I don't have a great mind, but I think alike. :lol:

Yes, I know they are metaphorical. But then, why can't "As soon as M. Jordan came in, the game became excited." be understood as a metaphor? I mean, I think there is a case where the players get excited, animated, once M.Jordan came in and kicks their a..., excuse me, butts.

Perhaps I would become excited if I saw that Michael Jordan was entering the game, but I would use something else to describe the tenor of the game. Perhaps animated or exciting or interesting.

:)
 

Taka

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RonBee said:
Perhaps I would become excited if I saw that Michael Jordan was entering the game, but I would use something else to describe the tenor of the game. Perhaps animated or exciting or interesting.

:)

I know you would normally choose those words instead of "excited". But that's not my question. My question is, why can't "As soon as M. Jordan came in, the game became excited." be understood as a metaphor?

One more thing to ask. You said you would use "animated". If "animated" is possible, why not "excited"?
 
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Taka said:
RonBee said:
Perhaps I would become excited if I saw that Michael Jordan was entering the game, but I would use something else to describe the tenor of the game. Perhaps animated or exciting or interesting.

:)

I know you would normally choose those words instead of "excited". But that's not my question. My question is, why can't "As soon as M. Jordan came in, the game became excited." be understood as a metaphor?

One more thing to ask. You said you would use "animated". If "animated" is possible, why not "excited"?

I see no reason why it can't be understood as a metaphor. When I read it in your first post, that's way I understood it.
 

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My first reaction is that we don't use 'excited' for inanimate things, but I'll have to mull it over. ;-)
 

RonBee

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Taka said:
RonBee said:
Perhaps I would become excited if I saw that Michael Jordan was entering the game, but I would use something else to describe the tenor of the game. Perhaps animated or exciting or interesting.

:)

I know you would normally choose those words instead of "excited". But that's not my question. My question is, why can't "As soon as M. Jordan came in, the game became excited." be understood as a metaphor?

One more thing to ask. You said you would use "animated". If "animated" is possible, why not "excited"?

I would use "animated" to describe the pace of the game. (You could also say a game is fast or slow.) But "excited" would, in my opinion, describe the way the game feels, but games don't have feelings. (True, electrons can become excited, but electrons move; games usually do not.)

:)
 

Taka

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RonBee said:
I would use "animated" to describe the pace of the game. (You could also say a game is fast or slow.) But "excited" would, in my opinion, describe the way the game feels, but games don't have feelings. (True, electrons can become excited, but electrons move; games usually do not.)

:)

"An excited game" is acceptable, but, according to your theory, "the game became excited" is not.

Such an enigma...really... :?
 

Casiopea

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Taka said:
FYI, check this out:

"I'm just trying to play a relaxed game," Miller said. "An excited game isn't the style that works up here and luckily for me, I'm more relaxed, not real flashy and flamboyant. I can let the game kind of come to me."

http://www.usatoday.com/sports/scores103/103016/20030116NHL--SANJOSE---0nr.htm

What do you think?

It's new. :D
It means, tensed-up, heated.

An excited game: a tensed-up game / a heated game
The game became excited: The game got tense / heated.
Don't get all excited: tensed up / heated

Douitashimashite 8)
 

Taka

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Casiopea said:
It's new. :D

You mean it was quite recently that native speakers started using it?

Casiopea said:
The game became excited: The game got tense / heated.

So, though not widely, it is acceptable, as Mr. Will says, right?
 

Casiopea

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Taka said:
Casiopea said:
It's new. :D

You mean it was quite recently that native speakers started using it?

Casiopea said:
The game became excited: The game got tense / heated.

So, though not widely, it is acceptable, as Mr. Will says, right?

Well, it's acceptable within a certain area (i.e. sports). :D It's a semantic extension of sorts which has yet to make its way through the language. It's still on the fringe; but, if speakers start using it elsewhere (i.e. outside of sports), it may catch on. At the moment, though, it comes across as awkward, especially if speakers haven't heard it before.

1. John is exciting. (Describes what people think of John)
2. John is excited. (Describes John's emotional state)

3. The game is exciting. (Describes what people think of the game)
4. The game is excited. (Describes the games emotional state.) NOT OK

Try, the players/fans excite/stir up the game:

5. The game is (being) excited (by the players/by the fans) . OK
6. Don't excite the game! OK
7. It's an excited/stirred up/heated game. OK

All the best,
 

Taka

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So, "As soon as Michael Jordan came in, the game became excited." is OK?
 

Taka

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Casiopea said:
Taka said:
So, "As soon as Michael Jordan came in, the game became excited." is OK?

The game got stirred up, tense, heated up. :D

All the best,

I'm asking you if it sounds natural to you or not.
 

Casiopea

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Taka said:
Casiopea said:
Taka said:
So, "As soon as Michael Jordan came in, the game became excited." is OK?

The game got stirred up, tense, heated up. :D

All the best,

I'm asking you if it sounds natural to you or not.

I've stated my professional opinion: The game did not get exciting; it got stirred up, heated, tense. :D (My personal opinion is of no consequence. It's all about what you think. 8))

What do you think? :D
 
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