To rain on someone's parade

Bassim

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I have tried to use "to rain on someone's parade" in my sentence. I am wondering if it makes sense in English.

Michael was eating a delicious dinner in a restaurant when his ex with her new boyfriend came inside, and they rained on his parade.
 

emsr2d2

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Michael was eating a delicious dinner in a restaurant when his ex [STRIKE]with[/STRIKE] and her new boyfriend came [STRIKE]inside[/STRIKE] in; [STRIKE]and they[/STRIKE] ​that really rained on his parade.

Just eating a delicious meal isn't really enough to warrant the phrase. If he'd been out celebrating a huge event, like his graduation or something similar, it would work. It needs to be more of a special event which is really highly anticipated. The example I gave about the woman really looking forward to a date would be a perfect example for this phrase as well as the "brushfire" one.
 
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