too much

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navi tasan

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Can one use:
1-He followed the other player too much.
instead of:
2-He followed the other player too far.

Can one use:
3-The surgeon pushed the knife in too much.
instead of:
4-The surgeon pushed the knife in too far.

Gratefully,
Navi.
 

probus

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Depending on what game is being discussed, 1 might be possible, but might mean something different from 2.

3 is not possible, and for that matter 4 sounds unnatural too. I would have said "The surgeon cut too deep."
 

Tdol

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I don't get the intended meaning with 1 and 2.
 

probus

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I was thinking, for example, of basketball. If a defender sticks too close to his opponent on man defense (AmE spelling mandatory in basketball ;-)) he might be said to be following him too much, or more likely too closely. But if an offensive player breaks towards the corner, a defender should not follow him too far, because there is nothing available to the attacker in the corner but a poor shot. It is better to ease off to ensure the attacker cannot switch to some other maneuver.
 

Tdol

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Thanks- basketball is pretty much a closed book to me, though not as closed as baseball.
 

emsr2d2

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I would say "He shouldn't mark his opponent too closely" but admittedly that only refers to the proximity to the other player. It makes no reference to the fact that he should give up marking the other player, for example, halfway down the court.
 

navi tasan

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Thank you all very much,

I was thinking, for example, of basketball. If a defender sticks too close to his opponent on man defense (AmE spelling mandatory in basketball ;-)) he might be said to be following him too much, or more likely too closely. But if an offensive player breaks towards the corner, a defender should not follow him too far, because there is nothing available to the attacker in the corner but a poor shot. It is better to ease off to ensure the attacker cannot switch to some other maneuver.

Yes, that was the intended meaning, although I think that case might exist in certain other sports as well. But it seems that in this case, only "too far" works, and "too much" does not.

Gratefully,
Navi.
 
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