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Taka

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The sentence:

The cell becomes two, then four, and so on, and after a while the last trace is gone.

What exactly does "the last trace" mean? Why not just "the trace" but "the last trace"??
 

Casiopea

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Taka said:
The sentence:

The cell becomes two, then four, and so on, and after a while the last trace is gone.

What exactly does "the last trace" mean? Why not just "the trace" but "the last trace"??

Biology
The cell divided into two cells, then it divides into four cells, and so on, after a while the last trace element of the original cell is gone. :D
 

Taka

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Ah! I thought that should be the first trace. So I counted down...
 

Mister Micawber

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Actually, it's a little strange, Taka-- could you check the source and tell me 'the last trace of what'?
 

Casiopea

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Taka said:
But wrong, huh? :lol:

Yes and No. "No" in that trace means, trace element (i.e., the trace element has been redistributed to the point that is it no longer quantifiable) and, "Yes", because Quantum mechanics would have a thing or two to say about how to quantify such things. :D
 

Mister Micawber

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Lewis Thomas said:
...there are some creatures that do not seem to die at all; they simply vanish into their own progeny. single cells do this. the cell becomes two, then four, and so on, and after a while the last trace is gone. it cannot be see[n] as death; barring mutation, the descendants are simply the first cell, living all over again.

Thanks, Taka-- so, a 'trace' is 'a slight evidence' of the original cell, and the 'last trace' is just that: the final evidence of the original cell (as an entity) disappears eventually, down the generations.
 

Casiopea

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Mister Micawber said:
Lewis Thomas said:
...there are some creatures that do not seem to die at all; they simply vanish into their own progeny. single cells do this. the cell becomes two, then four, and so on, and after a while the last trace is gone. it cannot be see[n] as death; barring mutation, the descendants are simply the first cell, living all over again.

Thanks, Taka-- so, a 'trace' is 'a slight evidence' of the original cell, and the 'last trace' is just that: the final evidence of the original cell (as an entity) disappears eventually, down the generations.

I couldn't have said it better myself. :up: Hey, wait a minute! I did:

Casiopea said:
Biology
The cell divided into two cells, then it divides into four cells, and so on, after a while the last trace element of the original cell is gone.

:?:
 

Mister Micawber

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Just clarifying, Cass-- 'trace element' also has a discrete definition, as you know.
 

Taka

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Mister Micawber said:
Just clarifying, Cass-- 'trace element' also has a discrete definition, as you know.

Thank you, teachers!

(FYI, Mister Micawber, Cas is from the same country as yours, Canada.)
 

Casiopea

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Mister Micawber said:
Just clarifying, Cass-- 'trace element' also has a discrete definition, as you know.

Clarification is a good thing. :D Making reference to previous posts is also a good thing. Both give the reader a better picture. 8)

All the best, :D
 

Taka

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Mister Micawber said:
Then no doubt she is as mellow and laid-back as I am, Taka.

:D

By the way, strictly, there is a trace left in every cell, DNA, right?
 

Casiopea

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Taka said:
Mister Micawber said:
Just clarifying, Cass-- 'trace element' also has a discrete definition, as you know.

Thank you, teachers!

(FYI, Mister Micawber, Cas is from the same country as yours, Canada.)

You're welcome, and Thank You. :D

MM's contributions are wonderful. :up:
 
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