trip on the subway- travel or moving

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keannu

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We can often hear on the Seoul subway an announcement that "Please passengers, have a nice travel on the subway..." in Korean.
I think the subway agency probably mistranslated "trip" to "travel" as they normally make a movement(trip) on the subway for short distance.
I suspect this announcement came from New York subway or any English-speaking country's custom. What about in UK or in the states? Do you ever hear this kind of announcement?
 

SoothingDave

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No, you don't have "a travel." You could use "trip."

The people movers I am used to dealing with in airports aren't so courteous. They usually say "Move away from the doors!" and "This train is departing for Terminal A, please hold on."
 

Celestial

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Sorry, I'm not from the UK or States..but I think now it is a very slight difference between 'travel' and 'trip' in spoken english, and also because we use the verb 'to travel' in the context 'to travel by train', 'to travel by bus' that means 'to go on by train/bus'
 

Raymott

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Sorry, I'm not from the UK or States..but I think now it is a very slight difference between 'travel' and 'trip' in spoken english, and also because we use the verb 'to travel' in the context 'to travel by train', 'to travel by bus' that means 'to go on by train/bus'
A 'trip' is also a 'journey', especially if it's a long trip. But it's never a 'travel'.
'Travel' is an uncountable noun, as in "Do you enjoy travel? Travel is one of my hobbies." You can say, "Did you enjoy your travels?" But not, "I went on a travel".
(The only use of 'a travel' I know of is in basketball, and is when you run holding the ball - that's a travel)

Also, "to trip" is wrong. But we're talking about the noun. You can travel on a trip, but you can't trip on a travel (unless you're playing basketball)
 

keannu

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My question was trip can have "actual travel or jouney" as in 1 or just "movement for some distance" as in 2. The trip on the subway in Seoul must be 2 for most passengers going to work, home, etc. So the announcement shouldn't be "즐거운 여행 되시기 바랍니다.", which means "Have a nice trip(journey)", although "Have a nice movement" would sound awkward in both languages.
I wonder if they adopted the announcement from English. Do you hear that kind of announcement on the subway?

1.We went on a trip to the mountains
2.We had to
make several trips to bring all the equipment over
 

Raymott

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My question was trip can have "actual travel or jouney" as in 1 or just "movement for some distance" as in 2. The trip on the subway in Seoul must be 2 for most passengers going to work, home, etc. So the announcement shouldn't be "즐거운 여행 되시기 바랍니다.", which means "Have a nice trip(journey)", although "Have a nice movement" would sound awkward in both languages.
I wonder if they adopted the announcement from English. Do you hear that kind of announcement on the subway?

1.We went on a trip to the mountains
2.We had to
make several trips to bring all the equipment over
I think Dave answered that in #2, at least for US. Also, in Australia, there are no announcements, "Have a nice trip/travel/journey".
On a plane, you get, "We hope you've enjoyed your flight. Thank for you flying with Qantas". But that wasn't your question either. (Sometimes you get extra advice free. It's all part of the service!).
 
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