two combinations of the noun "stroke"

JACEK1

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Hello

Does the sentence "She gave the dog's head a stroke" mean the same as "She gave the dog a stroke on the head"?

I do not know and so it is better to check with you.

What is your opinion?

Thank you.

By stroke I mean the act of moving one's hand gently over the dog's fluffy head. This time it is a noun.
 

GoesStation

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The sentences are equivalent.
 

Rover_KE

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I don't think they're natural in any variety of English.
 

Tdol

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She stroked the dog's head works better for me.
 

JACEK1

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I am sorry to be replying so late.

Are there any other ways of expressing the same thought using the word "stroke", be it a noun or a verb?
 

JACEK1

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Not exactly, but the meaning could be retained. The meaning of the word "stroke" (gently move one's hand over something) could also remain.
 

JACEK1

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So you tend to use "stroke someone or something" instead of "stroke someone on (the head)", for instance, don't you?
 

GoesStation

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So you tend to use "stroke someone or something" instead of "stroke someone on (the head)", for instance, don't you?

Yes.
 

Barb_D

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These questions make it even more clear how complex English is.

There's nothing wrong with "I gave the dog a quick pat on the head" or "He patted me on the shoulder" and yet "stroke" (which should act the same way) sounds wrong.

I guess it's more a matter of what we tend to do - there are no rules that say it's ungrammatical. We just all agree it's unnatural.
 

tedmc

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I think, stroking, being an endearing action, is usually repeated. Thus, it sounds odd to say that someone is given a stroke(on a part of the body).
 

emsr2d2

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I think (no comma here) stroking, being an endearing action, is usually repeated. Thus, it sounds odd to say that someone is given a stroke space before opening bracket (on a part of the body).

Even so, that's what you'll hear.

"Go on, give the cute dog a stroke."

We're not actually suggesting just one single stroke.
 
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