Two idioms-same meaning?

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P. Fogg

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Do these two idioms have the same meaning?

1. to be as pleased as Punch
2. to be as merry as a lark

Which one is more common :?:

Thank you in advance and best regards.
 

henry

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P. Fogg said:
Do these two idioms have the same meaning?

1. to be as pleased as Punch
2. to be as merry as a lark

Which one is more common :?:

Thank you in advance and best regards.

I am not sure if I've ever heard of " to be merry as a lark."

:wink:
 

MikeNewYork

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P. Fogg said:
Do these two idioms have the same meaning?

1. to be as pleased as Punch
2. to be as merry as a lark

Which one is more common :?:

Thank you in advance and best regards.

They both involve happiness, but the first is usually about something specific. The second is more of a general tendency.

I am as pleased as punch to see you.
Oh, you know John. He's as merry as a lark/happy as a pig in slop.

I don't find either to be very common. The first was often used by Hubert Horatio Humphrey, a Minnesota politician and former Vice-President of the US (with Lyndon Johnson, 1964-1968).
 
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P. Fogg

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MikeNewYork said:
P. Fogg said:
Do these two idioms have the same meaning?

1. to be as pleased as Punch
2. to be as merry as a lark

Which one is more common :?:

Thank you in advance and best regards.

They both involve happiness, but the first is usually about something specific. The second is more of a general tendency.

I am as pleased as punch to see you.
Oh, you know John. He's as merry as a lark/happy as a pig in slop.

I don't find either to be very common. The first was often used by Hubert Horatio Humphrey, a Minnesota politician and former Vice-President of the US (with Lyndon Johnson, 1964-1968).

Could you tell me a more common one that involves happiness?

P. Fogg
 

MikeNewYork

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P. Fogg said:
MikeNewYork said:
P. Fogg said:
Do these two idioms have the same meaning?

1. to be as pleased as Punch
2. to be as merry as a lark

Which one is more common :?:

Thank you in advance and best regards.

They both involve happiness, but the first is usually about something specific. The second is more of a general tendency.

I am as pleased as punch to see you.
Oh, you know John. He's as merry as a lark/happy as a pig in slop.

I don't find either to be very common. The first was often used by Hubert Horatio Humphrey, a Minnesota politician and former Vice-President of the US (with Lyndon Johnson, 1964-1968).

Could you tell me a more common one that involves happiness?

P. Fogg

Well, "happy as a pig in slop/shit" is one. Be careful about the "shit" version -- it's not for polite company. :wink:
 
P

P. Fogg

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MikeNewYork said:
P. Fogg said:
MikeNewYork said:
P. Fogg said:
Do these two idioms have the same meaning?

1. to be as pleased as Punch
2. to be as merry as a lark

Which one is more common :?:

Thank you in advance and best regards.

They both involve happiness, but the first is usually about something specific. The second is more of a general tendency.

I am as pleased as punch to see you.
Oh, you know John. He's as merry as a lark/happy as a pig in slop.

I don't find either to be very common. The first was often used by Hubert Horatio Humphrey, a Minnesota politician and former Vice-President of the US (with Lyndon Johnson, 1964-1968).

Could you tell me a more common one that involves happiness?

P. Fogg

Well, "happy as a pig in slop/shit" is one. Be careful about the "shit" version -- it's not for polite company. :wink:

Thank you for your quick answer. :D

P. Fogg
 

MikeNewYork

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P. Fogg said:
MikeNewYork said:
P. Fogg said:
MikeNewYork said:
P. Fogg said:
Do these two idioms have the same meaning?

1. to be as pleased as Punch
2. to be as merry as a lark

Which one is more common :?:

Thank you in advance and best regards.

They both involve happiness, but the first is usually about something specific. The second is more of a general tendency.

I am as pleased as punch to see you.
Oh, you know John. He's as merry as a lark/happy as a pig in slop.

I don't find either to be very common. The first was often used by Hubert Horatio Humphrey, a Minnesota politician and former Vice-President of the US (with Lyndon Johnson, 1964-1968).

Could you tell me a more common one that involves happiness?

P. Fogg

Well, "happy as a pig in slop/shit" is one. Be careful about the "shit" version -- it's not for polite company. :wink:

Thank you for your quick answer. :D

P. Fogg

You're welcome. :wink:
 

blacknomi

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P. Fogg said:
Do these two idioms have the same meaning?
1. to be as pleased as Punch
2. to be as merry as a lark


3. happy as a box of birds
4. happy as a clam
5. happy as a flea at a dog show
6. happy as Larry


Questions.
1. Are they with the same meanings?
2. Can I say "You smile like a clam."
3. P.Fogg mentioned a phrase here "as pleased as Punch". Is it related to Punch and Judy show? A traditional children's entertainment in which a man, Mr Punch, argues with his wife, Judy. It was especially popular in the past as an entertainment in British towns by the sea in summer. (from dictionary cambridge website)


Well...curiosity kills sabrina. :lol:

Thank you in advance.
 
P

P. Fogg

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blacknomi said:
P. Fogg said:
Do these two idioms have the same meaning?
1. to be as pleased as Punch
2. to be as merry as a lark


3. happy as a box of birds
4. happy as a clam
5. happy as a flea at a dog show
6. happy as Larry


Questions.
1. Are they with the same meanings?
2. Can I say "You smile like a clam."
3. P.Fogg mentioned a phrase here "as pleased as Punch". Is it related to Punch and Judy show? A traditional children's entertainment in which a man, Mr Punch, argues with his wife, Judy. It was especially popular in the past as an entertainment in British towns by the sea in summer. (from dictionary cambridge website)

Well...curiosity kills sabrina. :lol:

Thank you in advance.

My dictionary shows a relation between the phrase an the show.

P. Fogg
 

MikeNewYork

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blacknomi said:
P. Fogg said:
Do these two idioms have the same meaning?
1. to be as pleased as Punch
2. to be as merry as a lark


3. happy as a box of birds
4. happy as a clam
5. happy as a flea at a dog show
6. happy as Larry


Questions.
1. Are they with the same meanings?
2. Can I say "You smile like a clam."
3. P.Fogg mentioned a phrase here "as pleased as Punch". Is it related to Punch and Judy show? A traditional children's entertainment in which a man, Mr Punch, argues with his wife, Judy. It was especially popular in the past as an entertainment in British towns by the sea in summer. (from dictionary cambridge website)


Well...curiosity kills sabrina. :lol:

Thank you in advance.

1. I've heard #4 and #5.

Also "happy as a kid in a candy store".

2. Never heard that.

3. Very possible. :wink:
 

Tdol

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MikeNewYork said:
Well, "happy as a pig in slop/shit" is one. Be careful about the "shit" version -- it's not for polite company. :wink:
Guess which version is more common in the UK?;-)
 

MikeNewYork

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tdol said:
MikeNewYork said:
Well, "happy as a pig in slop/shit" is one. Be careful about the "shit" version -- it's not for polite company. :wink:
Guess which version is more common in the UK?;-)

I think it's more common here, too. :wink:
 

blacknomi

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MikeNewYork said:
tdol said:
MikeNewYork said:
Well, "happy as a pig in slop/shit" is one. Be careful about the "shit" version -- it's not for polite company. :wink:
Guess which version is more common in the UK?;-)

I think it's more common here, too. :wink:

Thank you very much,Mike.

#4 and #5 are from cassell's dictionary of slang, by Jonathon Green.
happy as a clam --> [mid 19C] (US) very happy, totally satisfied.
happy as Larry --> [20C] (Aus) perfectly happy, quite content [ety:unknown]


Who do pigs feel happy in slop/shit? :roll: :roll: :roll:

How about "happy as a boxing kangaroo in fog time" ?


sabrina
 

Tdol

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'Happy as Larry' has crossed over into British English.;-)
 

MikeNewYork

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blacknomi said:
Thank you very much,Mike.

#4 and #5 are from cassell's dictionary of slang, by Jonathon Green.
happy as a clam --> [mid 19C] (US) very happy, totally satisfied.
happy as Larry --> [20C] (Aus) perfectly happy, quite content [ety:unknown]


Who do pigs feel happy in slop/shit? :roll: :roll: :roll:

How about "happy as a boxing kangaroo in fog time" ?

You're welcome.

Pigs don't have sweat glands in their skin, so they are prone to overheating in hot weather. Some breeds also are prone to sunburn. Pigs roll around in mud (an other things) to help stay cool in hot weather.

I never heard the kangaroo one. What does it mean? :?
 

blacknomi

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MikeNewYork said:
blacknomi said:
Thank you very much,Mike.

#4 and #5 are from cassell's dictionary of slang, by Jonathon Green.
happy as a clam --> [mid 19C] (US) very happy, totally satisfied.
happy as Larry --> [20C] (Aus) perfectly happy, quite content [ety:unknown]


Who do pigs feel happy in slop/shit? :roll: :roll: :roll:

How about "happy as a boxing kangaroo in fog time" ?

You're welcome.

Pigs don't have sweat glands in their skin, so they are prone to overheating in hot weather. Some breeds also are prone to sunburn. Pigs roll around in mud (an other things) to help stay cool in hot weather.

I never heard the kangaroo one. What does it mean? :?

It means very discontented, very unhappy. A phrase from Australia, created in the 20th century.


sabrina :lol:
 

twostep

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"happy as a lark" is quite frequently being used by the older population in the South. "Chipper" may be the equivalent the past baby boomer generation uses.
 

blacknomi

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MikeNewYork said:
Pigs don't have sweat glands in their skin, so they are prone to overheating in hot weather. Some breeds also are prone to sunburn. Pigs roll around in mud (an other things) to help stay cool in hot weather.

I never heard the kangaroo one. What does it mean? :?


Now I start to imagine those happy pigs rolling in Mike's grammar pool.
Many thanks to you.

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:


sabrina
 

MikeNewYork

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blacknomi said:
MikeNewYork said:
Pigs don't have sweat glands in their skin, so they are prone to overheating in hot weather. Some breeds also are prone to sunburn. Pigs roll around in mud (an other things) to help stay cool in hot weather.

I never heard the kangaroo one. What does it mean? :?


Now I start to imagine those happy pigs rolling in Mike's grammar pool.
Many thanks to you.

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:


sabrina

You're welcome! :lol: :lol: :lol:
 

bmo

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P. Fogg said:
Could you tell me a more common one that involves happiness?

P. Fogg

Happiness idioms:

1. In seventh heaven - John has been in seventh heaven since he and Mary got back together.

2. On cloud nine - Boy, wasn't I on cloud nine when I got that admission letter from Yale.

3. On top of the world - He feels like he is on top of the world, singing and whistling all day long.

4. Look like the cat that swallowed the canary - very, very happy. He looks like the cat that swallowed the canary; he went out and bought two cars in a day.

BMO
 
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