two verbs in a sentence?

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Hi, in the sentence "if you want to get your house sold fast, you need to strike while the iron is hot", there are two verbs in the if-clause. The first one is infinitive - to get-and the second one is sold. My question is why the second verb is in past tense. Is that always the case, such that, when there are two verbs in a row, the second one is alwasy in the past tense. I'd really appreciate it if you can answer this for me. Thanks.
 

2006

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Hi, in the sentence "if you want to get your house sold fast, you need to strike while the iron is hot", there are two verbs in the if-clause. The first one is infinitive - to get-and the second one is sold. My question is why the second verb is in past tense. In that sentence, "sold" is not a verb; it is an adjective. You have to remember that past tense verbs often act as adjectives.

If you want to get your house painted, you can call me.
If you want to buy your food cooked, you can go to a restaurant.



Is that always the case, such that, when there are two verbs in a row, the second one is alwasy in the past tense. No! Thanks.
2006
 
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