unrequited love

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Joe

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Dec 31, 2003
If I love a girl, but she does not love me. I can call my love "unrequited love". But if I love her, but she has not idea that I love her because I have never revealed my feelings for her. Can we say that this is also "unrequited love"?

And, in the latter case, how can I say it using a verb? For example, can I say something like "I love her secretly"? What is the most common expression?

Thanks.
:wink:
 

Casiopea

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Joe said:
If I love a girl, but she does not love me. I can call my love "unrequited love". But if I love her, but she has not idea that I love her because I have never revealed my feelings for her. Can we say that this is also "unrequited love"?

And, in the latter case, how can I say it using a verb? For example, can I say something like "I love her secretly"? What is the most common expression?

Thanks.
:wink:

Hmm. Great question! From literature, notably the 16th century, poets and writers used the word 'unrequited' to refer to feelings of love they had for another that had not been reciprocated. In some cases, the object of the poets' or writers' affection (the women) were unaware that someone was in love with them "from afar".

Hope that helps.

All the best,
 

Joe

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Dec 31, 2003
Casiopea said:
Hmm. Great question! From literature, notably the 16th century, poets and writers used the word 'unrequited' to refer to feelings of love they had for another that had not been reciprocated. In some cases, the object of the poets' or writers' affection (the women) were unaware that someone was in love with them "from afar".

Hope that helps.

All the best,

Thanks, Casiopea. So, can I say something like "I have unrequited love for her"? What is the most common expression?
:wink:
 

Tdol

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'My love for her is unrequited' works. ;-)
 

Tdol

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I haven't heard that in quite a while, like 'taking a shine to someone'.;-)
 
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