Use of the word "Fraught".

Azmat

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I have mostly seen the word "Fraught" to be followed "with". As in: Fraught with fear, fraught with memories or fraught with errors, for example.
But recently, read it in the NY Times article in a different sense. Can someone explain?

The sentence in the article is:
"In agreeing to hear two cases on President Trump’s travel ban, the court introduced a new phrase to the fraught discussion of refugees and Muslim immigrants: “bona fide relationship.”

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/27/us/trump-travel-ban-refugees-supreme-court.html
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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Here, it's simply being used as an adjective to describe the kind of discussion being held, meaning that the discussion is tense and problematic.
 
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