[Grammar] using gerunds

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amigos

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Hi,

can I use gerunds with the word "concede" without using preposition "to" as in the sentence below?

He concedes killing his wife.



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amigos
 

emsr2d2

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He conceded that he [had] killed his wife.
 

billmcd

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Hi,

can I use gerunds with the word "concede" without using preposition "to" as in the sentence below?

He concedes killing his wife.



Thanks
amigos

You would hear/read it expressed that way.
 

5jj

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He admits killing his wife.
He admits to killing his wife.


Those two are fine, but He concedes (to) killing his wife sounds wrong to me.
 

emsr2d2

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He admits killing his wife.
He admits to killing his wife.


Those two are fine, but He concedes (to) killing his wife sounds wrong to me.

Ditto. I wouldn't use "concede" and follow it with "to" or a gerund.

He conceded that he killed his wife.
He conceded that he had killed his wife.
He conceded the fact that he [had] killed his wife.

Along the same lines as 5jj, I would use:

He admitted killing his wife.
He admitted to killing his wife.
He admitted to having killed his wife.
 

billmcd

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You would hear/read it expressed that way.

"Admit" is one of several verbs that typically and correctly may be followed by a gerund and while it might be a stretch, I would include "concede" which is, at least, similar in meaning.
 

5jj

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"Admit" is one of several verbs that typically and correctly may be followed by a gerund and while it might be a stretch, I would include "concede" which is, at least, similar in meaning.
It's very similar in meaning in this context, but that does not, in itself, mean that it's used in identical ways.

Does the acceptability of "I advise you to go" mean that we can say "I suggest you to go"? I think not.
 
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billmcd

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It's very similar in meaning in this context, but that does not, in itself, mean that it's used in identical ways.

Does the acceptability of "I advise you to go" mean that we can say "I suggest you to go"? I think not. Nor do I, but they are obviously not the same terms . My Webster's includes a definition of "admit" as "to concede as true"

b.
 
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