vice president

Tan Elaine

Key Member
Joined
Jun 29, 2008
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
English
Home Country
Hong Kong
Current Location
Hong Kong
In the online Oxford Dictionaries, I find vice president written without a hyphen.

Do native speakers write the phrase with or without the hyphen?

Thanks.
 

andrewg927

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 9, 2017
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States

emsr2d2

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jul 28, 2009
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
UK
In BrE: vice-president.

Wikipedia confirms that this is the case when referring to a member of a government or to a business position.
 

andrewg927

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 9, 2017
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
So you say "vice-president Mike Pence" in BE? I have never seen that before.
 

Rover_KE

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jun 20, 2010
Member Type
Retired English Teacher
Native Language
English
Home Country
England
Current Location
England
No - we give him the title by which he is known in the USA:

'Vice President Mike Pence will visit the UK in September'.

But we would probably report 'Mike Pence, the American vice-president, will visit the UK in September'.
 
Last edited:

emsr2d2

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jul 28, 2009
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
UK
Yes, we would use the BrE hyphenated version when referring to British positions.

The vice-president of BritCo Ltd is coming to visit the local factory tomorrow.
Vice-President James Twonk, of BritCo Ltd, is coming to visit the local factory tomorrow.

We might well use the hyphenated version if we were talking about someone from a country where we don't know if the hyphenated version is used or not ("I have no idea who the vice-president of the Philippines is", for example). However, as Rover said, with an example like Mike Pence, we would know (or could easily find out) that the AmE style is "Vice President Mike Pence" so a writer would follow that style.
 
Last edited:

andrewg927

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 9, 2017
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
It was Rover, not Raymott. Give the guy a little credit. :)
 

emsr2d2

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jul 28, 2009
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
UK
Fixed! Sorry, Rover!
 
Top