vocabulary and grammar

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jiang

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Dear teachers,
I'd like to ask some questions.

No.1. When I use 'migrate' to refer to people it can mean go to another area or country. So when it means 'go to another country' it bears the same meaning with emigrate. Am I right?

No.2. You can't afford a new bicycle, you'll have to______.
a. settle for it b. go without
I think both are correct. Am I right?

No.3. After tea she will sit down by the fire, sometimes for_______an hour, and think of her young, confident days.
a. as much as b. as long as
I think both are correct. Am I right?

No.4. A few months ago I asked a question concerning with the use of quater. Here is a similar sentence:
I'll return to Canada after an interval ______.
a. of three years b. of three years' time

No.5. 'Don't shout at me.'----'I'll shout at ________I please.
The key is who. I don't understand why 'who'. What's the function of 'who'? If it is whoever, it makes sense. Or 'I'll shout at anyone who I please.' Am I right?

I am looking forward to hearing from you.

Thank you in advance.

Jiang
 

MikeNewYork

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jiang said:
Dear teachers,
I'd like to ask some questions.

No.1. When I use 'migrate' to refer to people it can mean go to another area or country. So when it means 'go to another country' it bears the same meaning with emigrate. Am I right?

Yes, that's right. You might appreciate this usage note:

USAGE NOTE Migrate, which is used of people and animals, sometimes implies a lack of permanent settlement, especially as a result of seasonal or periodic movement. Emigrate and immigrate are used only of people and imply a permanent move, generally across a political boundary. Emigrate describes the move relative to the point of departure: After the Nazis came to power in Germany, many scientists emigrated (that is, left Germany). By contrast, immigrate describes the move relative to the destination: The promise of prosperity in the United States encouraged many people to immigrate (that is, move to the United States).


No.2. You can't afford a new bicycle, you'll have to______.
a. settle for it b. go without
I think both are correct. Am I right?

To settle for something is to accept it reluctantly. It would be OK if "it" referred to a used bicycle. As it is written, I would choose b.

No.3. After tea she will sit down by the fire, sometimes for_______an hour, and think of her young, confident days.
a. as much as b. as long as
I think both are correct. Am I right?

Yes, In my opinion.


No.4. A few months ago I asked a question concerning with the use of quater. Here is a similar sentence:
I'll return to Canada after an interval ______.
a. of three years b. of three years' time


a. One doesn't need "interval" and "time".

No.5. 'Don't shout at me.'----'I'll shout at ________I please.
The key is who. I don't understand why 'who'. What's the function of 'who'? If it is whoever, it makes sense. Or 'I'll shout at anyone who I please.' Am I right?

The correct answer is whomever. Some would accept "whoever", but that is incorrect, IMO.
 

RonBee

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jiang said:
Dear teachers,
I'd like to ask some questions.

No.1. When I use 'migrate' to refer to people it can mean go to another area or country. So when it means 'go to another country' it bears the same meaning with emigrate. Am I right?

Yes. "Migrate" refers to movement from one place to another, while "emigrate" emphasizes the leaving of one place to go to another. Example:
  • My grandparents emigrated from Italy to the United States.
("Migrate" is more likely to refer to large groups of people than individuals.)

jiang said:
No.2. You can't afford a new bicycle, you'll have to______.
a. settle for it b. go without
I think both are correct. Am I right?

No. If you can't afford something that means you are unable to buy it. To settle for something means to accept a substitute.

jiang said:
No.3. After tea she will sit down by the fire, sometimes for_______an hour, and think of her young, confident days.
a. as much as b. as long as
I think both are correct. Am I right?

No, in English we think of time in terms of length, not quantity.

jiang said:
No.4. A few months ago I asked a question concerning with the use of quater. Here is a similar sentence:
I'll return to Canada after an interval ______.
a. of three years b. of three years' time

Either is good. :)

jiang said:
No.5. 'Don't shout at me.'----'I'll shout at ________I please.
The key is who. I don't understand why 'who'. What's the function of 'who'? If it is whoever, it makes sense. Or 'I'll shout at anyone who I please.' Am I right?

I would say whoever. Also, as you suggest, anyone is also good. (Mike is probably right that whomever is better.)

:)
 

jiang

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:D
Thank you very much for your explanation.

Jiang
MikeNewYork said:
jiang said:
Dear teachers,
I'd like to ask some questions.

No.1. When I use 'migrate' to refer to people it can mean go to another area or country. So when it means 'go to another country' it bears the same meaning with emigrate. Am I right?

Yes, that's right. You might appreciate this usage note:

USAGE NOTE Migrate, which is used of people and animals, sometimes implies a lack of permanent settlement, especially as a result of seasonal or periodic movement. Emigrate and immigrate are used only of people and imply a permanent move, generally across a political boundary. Emigrate describes the move relative to the point of departure: After the Nazis came to power in Germany, many scientists emigrated (that is, left Germany). By contrast, immigrate describes the move relative to the destination: The promise of prosperity in the United States encouraged many people to immigrate (that is, move to the United States).


No.2. You can't afford a new bicycle, you'll have to______.
a. settle for it b. go without
I think both are correct. Am I right?

To settle for something is to accept it reluctantly. It would be OK if "it" referred to a used bicycle. As it is written, I would choose b.

No.3. After tea she will sit down by the fire, sometimes for_______an hour, and think of her young, confident days.
a. as much as b. as long as
I think both are correct. Am I right?

Yes, In my opinion.


No.4. A few months ago I asked a question concerning with the use of quater. Here is a similar sentence:
I'll return to Canada after an interval ______.
a. of three years b. of three years' time


a. One doesn't need "interval" and "time".

No.5. 'Don't shout at me.'----'I'll shout at ________I please.
The key is who. I don't understand why 'who'. What's the function of 'who'? If it is whoever, it makes sense. Or 'I'll shout at anyone who I please.' Am I right?

The correct answer is whomever. Some would accept "whoever", but that is incorrect, IMO.
 

jiang

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Joined
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Member Type
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:?
Dear Ronbee,
I got different answers to No.3 (according to your explanation 'as long as 'is correct) and No.4. ( you think either is OK while Mike thinks only 'a' is correct).

Jiang

RonBee said:
jiang said:
Dear teachers,
I'd like to ask some questions.

No.1. When I use 'migrate' to refer to people it can mean go to another area or country. So when it means 'go to another country' it bears the same meaning with emigrate. Am I right?

Yes. "Migrate" refers to movement from one place to another, while "emigrate" emphasizes the leaving of one place to go to another. Example:
  • My grandparents emigrated from Italy to the United States.
("Migrate" is more likely to refer to large groups of people than individuals.)

jiang said:
No.2. You can't afford a new bicycle, you'll have to______.
a. settle for it b. go without
I think both are correct. Am I right?

No. If you can't afford something that means you are unable to buy it. To settle for something means to accept a substitute.

jiang said:
No.3. After tea she will sit down by the fire, sometimes for_______an hour, and think of her young, confident days.
a. as much as b. as long as
I think both are correct. Am I right?

No, in English we think of time in terms of length, not quantity.

jiang said:
No.4. A few months ago I asked a question concerning with the use of quater. Here is a similar sentence:
I'll return to Canada after an interval ______.
a. of three years b. of three years' time

Either is good. :)

jiang said:
No.5. 'Don't shout at me.'----'I'll shout at ________I please.
The key is who. I don't understand why 'who'. What's the function of 'who'? If it is whoever, it makes sense. Or 'I'll shout at anyone who I please.' Am I right?

I would say whoever. Also, as you suggest, anyone is also good. (Mike is probably right that whomever is better.)

:)
 

RonBee

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jiang said:
:?
Dear Ronbee,
I got different answers to No.3 (according to your explanation 'as long as 'is correct) and No.4. ( you think either is OK while Mike thinks only 'a' is correct).

Jiang

RonBee said:
jiang said:
Dear teachers,
I'd like to ask some questions.

No.1. When I use 'migrate' to refer to people it can mean go to another area or country. So when it means 'go to another country' it bears the same meaning with emigrate. Am I right?

Yes. "Migrate" refers to movement from one place to another, while "emigrate" emphasizes the leaving of one place to go to another. Example:
  • My grandparents emigrated from Italy to the United States.
("Migrate" is more likely to refer to large groups of people than individuals.)

jiang said:
No.2. You can't afford a new bicycle, you'll have to______.
a. settle for it b. go without
I think both are correct. Am I right?

No. If you can't afford something that means you are unable to buy it. To settle for something means to accept a substitute.

jiang said:
No.3. After tea she will sit down by the fire, sometimes for_______an hour, and think of her young, confident days.
a. as much as b. as long as
I think both are correct. Am I right?

No, in English we think of time in terms of length, not quantity.

jiang said:
No.4. A few months ago I asked a question concerning with the use of quater. Here is a similar sentence:
I'll return to Canada after an interval ______.
a. of three years b. of three years' time

Either is good. :)

jiang said:
No.5. 'Don't shout at me.'----'I'll shout at ________I please.
The key is who. I don't understand why 'who'. What's the function of 'who'? If it is whoever, it makes sense. Or 'I'll shout at anyone who I please.' Am I right?

I would say whoever. Also, as you suggest, anyone is also good. (Mike is probably right that whomever is better.)

:)

I thought I had beat him to the punch, but apparently Mike had already been at it when I started with that question. :wink:

Anyhow, I agree with Mike about number four. That is, b is redundant. However, I think it is more a question if style than grammar. Both answers mean the same thing. Maybe Mike will change his mind on number three.

:wink:
 

MikeNewYork

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jiang said:
:D
Thank you very much for your explanation.

Jiang

You're very welcome. :wink:
 

MikeNewYork

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RonBee said:
I thought I had beat him to the punch, but apparently Mike had already been at it when I started with that question. :wink:

Anyhow, I agree with Mike about number four. That is, b is redundant. However, I think it is more a question if style than grammar. Both answers mean the same thing. Maybe Mike will change his mind on number three.

:wink:

It is always good to have small differences of opinion. I will agree with you that "long" is a little better than "much", but I don't consider "much" to be incorrect. "Much" deals with quantity, amount, and extent. I think that time can be looked at as extent.

As to the other, I also agree that, in many cases, redundancy is an issue of style more than grammar. I simply prefer the simpler phrase.

:wink:
 

jiang

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:)
I see. Thanks.
Jiang


RonBee said:
jiang said:
:?
Dear Ronbee,
I got different answers to No.3 (according to your explanation 'as long as 'is correct) and No.4. ( you think either is OK while Mike thinks only 'a' is correct).

Jiang

RonBee said:
jiang said:
Dear teachers,
I'd like to ask some questions.

No.1. When I use 'migrate' to refer to people it can mean go to another area or country. So when it means 'go to another country' it bears the same meaning with emigrate. Am I right?

Yes. "Migrate" refers to movement from one place to another, while "emigrate" emphasizes the leaving of one place to go to another. Example:
  • My grandparents emigrated from Italy to the United States.
("Migrate" is more likely to refer to large groups of people than individuals.)

jiang said:
No.2. You can't afford a new bicycle, you'll have to______.
a. settle for it b. go without
I think both are correct. Am I right?

No. If you can't afford something that means you are unable to buy it. To settle for something means to accept a substitute.

jiang said:
No.3. After tea she will sit down by the fire, sometimes for_______an hour, and think of her young, confident days.
a. as much as b. as long as
I think both are correct. Am I right?

No, in English we think of time in terms of length, not quantity.

jiang said:
No.4. A few months ago I asked a question concerning with the use of quater. Here is a similar sentence:
I'll return to Canada after an interval ______.
a. of three years b. of three years' time

Either is good. :)

jiang said:
No.5. 'Don't shout at me.'----'I'll shout at ________I please.
The key is who. I don't understand why 'who'. What's the function of 'who'? If it is whoever, it makes sense. Or 'I'll shout at anyone who I please.' Am I right?

I would say whoever. Also, as you suggest, anyone is also good. (Mike is probably right that whomever is better.)

:)

I thought I had beat him to the punch, but apparently Mike had already been at it when I started with that question. :wink:

Anyhow, I agree with Mike about number four. That is, b is redundant. However, I think it is more a question if style than grammar. Both answers mean the same thing. Maybe Mike will change his mind on number three.

:wink:
 

RonBee

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I agree with Mike that in general the simpler the better. I prefer the simpler phrase also. In general, the simpler phrase will be better for clarity.

:)
 

MikeNewYork

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RonBee said:
I agree with Mike that in general the simpler the better. I prefer the simpler phrase also. In general, the simpler phrase will be better for clarity.

:)

:wink:
 
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