"Wanna be part of it"

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"Wanna be part of it" is a hong kong ad's slogan
but ... can be "say wanna be a part of it"?
and what's the difference? :?:
 

RonBee

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Correction/suggestion

beabea said:
"Wanna be part of it" is a hong kong ad's slogan
but ... can be "say wanna be a part of it"?
and what's the difference? :?:

"Wanna be part of it" is a hong kong ad.

Could it be phrased as "Say wanna be part of it"?

No.

What's the difference?

The one makes sense. The other doesn't. To be a part of something is to be involved in it, to participate in it.

8)
 

Tdol

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If you mean the difference between 'part' and 'a part', then I'd say that, here, the omission of the indefinite article brings the person closer to whatever it is that they want to be involved in. If you're part, you're in the flow of things together with all the others as one. If you're 'a part', it is more delineated and defined and not, presumably, as exciting. It would be OK with the article, though. Ron's right about the word 'say' not making sense there. ;-)
 
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bea

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beabea said:
"Wanna be part of it" is a hong kong ad's slogan
but ... can be "say wanna be a part of it"?
and what's the difference? :?:

sorry..
Make a correction
can be say " wanna be a part of it"?
 

Tdol

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I don't know if our posts have crossed, but I've already posted an answer up to that. BTW, welcome to UsingEnglish.com- I hope you find the forum useful. ;-)
 

RonBee

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Correction/suggestion

can be say " wanna be a part of it"?

Perhaps you mean "Can we say...." The use of the indefinite article there might or might not make a difference in practical usage. (TDOL's earlier post indicated the possible distinction.)

8)
 

Tdol

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You're right that it might or might not make a distinction- they could also be used synonymously- I was trying to create a difference to show how they could differ. ;-)
 
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bea

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I want Ron to understand what I asked so I correct my question.

Thanks.
Your answer is very good!
:D
 

Tdol

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You're welcome. ;-)
 
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