[Grammar] want (lack)

inase

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In general, "want" does not take the progressive form. (x I am wanting water.) However, it seems that when you are given a present, you may say, "I've been wanting this."
To my knowledge, "want", when it means "lack", may take the progressive form more frequently although it is the state (not action) verb.
I wonder if these variations are possible when "want" means "lack."

1. He wants courage.
2. He wants in courage.
3. He is wanting courage.
4. He is wanting in courage.
5. Courage is wanting in him.

Do both Americans and the British use this phrase?
6. He is slightly wanting. (meaning he is a little stupid)

Inase
 

GoesStation

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Do both Americans and the British use this phrase?
6. He is slightly wanting. (meaning he is a little stupid)
It doesn't sound natural with that meaning to my American English-trained ears.
 

Rover_KE

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'Want' meaning 'lack' is only used in poetic/literary texts these days.

Avoid it in casual conversation.
 

GoesStation

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It also persists in the saying Waste not, want not. Years ago I tried and failed to explain that one to a Chilean friend. :-(
 
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