...we need to save enough money so that we can go on pilgrimage...

Tan Elaine

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Our Reverend told that we need to save enough money so that we can go on pilgrimage to the Head Temple.

The above sentence is from a Buddhist magazine.

1) Is 'enough' necessary?
2) Should 'can' be replaced by 'are able to"?
2) Should 'need to' be replaced by 'needed to'?

Thanks.
 

emsr2d2

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Our Reverend told us that we need to save enough money [STRIKE]so that we can[/STRIKE] to go on a/the pilgrimage to the Head Temple.

The above sentence is from a Buddhist magazine.

1) Is 'enough' necessary?
As I have shown above, "enough" doesn't really work with "so that we can".
2) Should 'can' be replaced by 'are able to"?
No.
3) Should 'need to' be replaced by 'needed to'?
It depends. If you haven't saved enough money yet, you can use "need to". However, standard backshifting in reported speech would result in "needed to" anyway.

Thanks.

See above. I suspect the original sentence was not written by a native English speaker.
 

Tan Elaine

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Thanks, emsr2d2.

You're correct. The sentence was written by a Japanese.
 

emsr2d2

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Thanks, emsr2d2.

You're correct. The sentence was written by a Japanese person/man/woman.

See above. We don't tend to use "a Japanese" as a noun. It does work for some nationalities (an American, a Brit, a Swede etc).
 

Tan Elaine

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See above. We don't tend to use "a Japanese" as a noun. It does work for some nationalities (an American, a Brit, a Swede etc).
Thanks, that's interesting.
 
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