[General] Wear a cap/cap.

arjitsharma

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I have often heard people that they don't use an article when they speak this way:
1. Wear sunglasses and go out in the sun.
2. Wear cap before you go out.
3. Wear underwear and get out of the bathroom.

Why an article is not added before the nouns after the verb wear?

People say this way too:
1. Adam always wears a cap when he gets out in the sun.
2. Susan carries an umbrella just in case.

I was taught by you all to use an article before a common noun. But, in a instructional context I can't use an article. I would like to know can I say an instructional context or can't in day to day English? I was taught that an instructional context can only be written not said. Is it correct?
 

teechar

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I have often heard people [STRIKE]that they don't[/STRIKE] not use an article when they, e.g., say: [STRIKE]speak this way:[/STRIKE]

1. Wear sunglasses and go out in the sun.
You don't use an indefinite article with plurals. That sentence is grammatical. If you were referring to known/specific sunglasses, you would use "the sunglasses."

2. Wear cap before you go out.
That's simply wrong! You need "a cap" in that sentence.

3. Wear underwear and get out of the bathroom.
That's grammatical. "Underwear" is an uncountable plural noun.

Why is an article [STRIKE]is[/STRIKE] not added before the nouns after the verb "wear?"
See above.

People say [STRIKE]this way[/STRIKE] these too:
1. Adam always wears a cap when he gets out in the sun.
2. Susan carries an umbrella just in case.
Those are grammatical.

I was taught by you all to use an article before a common noun.
Who said that?

But, in an instructional context, I can't use an article.
And who said that?!

I would like to know whether I can [STRIKE]say[/STRIKE] use "an instructional context" [STRIKE]or can't[/STRIKE] in day-to-day English.
You can, but not everyone would know what you were talking about.

I was taught that "an instructional context" can only be written, not said. Is [STRIKE]it[/STRIKE] that correct?
That is unequivocally incorrect. :shock:
 

emsr2d2

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Wearing a cap before you go out seems like overkill (and pointless if you then take it off again just before you leave the house).

Put on a cap before you go out.
Wear a cap when you're outside.
 

andrewg927

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If you mean "instructional context" as in a pamphlet, you may see articles omitted for the sake of space.
 

Tdol

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I have often heard people that they don't use an article when they speak this way:

When an article is unstressed, it is there, but it can sometimes be difficult to hear, so they might be saying it in the second even though you don't hear it.
 
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