What do you think about the "2017/10/5" format?

jasmin39

Junior Member
Joined
Sep 5, 2013
Member Type
Other
Native Language
Japanese
Home Country
Japan
Current Location
Japan
What do you think about the "2017/10/5 (yyy/mmm/ddd) " format?

We are using the format on our calling app.
So, people all over the world will see this.

If you think that we should change the format, please tell me.

Thank you.
 
Last edited:

Rover_KE

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jun 20, 2010
Member Type
Retired English Teacher
Native Language
English
Home Country
England
Current Location
England
I'd leave it as is, although the day should be 05. I'm seeing this format more and more these days. It's perfectly understandable.

Note: years have four digits; months and days have two, so you need to write yyyy/mm/dd.
 

bubbha

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 2, 2016
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
Taiwan
In most of the world outside of East Asia, particularly in Europe, Africa, and the Americas, it's pretty much the universal popular standard to put the year last. There are two common ways to do this:
European: dd/mm/yyyy
USA: mm/dd/yyyy

The reason why it's starting to become more common to see the year first is threefold: 1) It's a format frequently used in East Asia, which has a high population and a strong influence on what we see on the Internet; and 2) It's a format that's easier for computers to process and put in order; 3) It's the ISO 8601 standard, which is pushed by some governments (e.g. Canada). However, even in Canada, it has not caught on among the general population.

If your chief target is the Western world, I strongly advise putting the year last, which is what we are used to. Even so, we will understand what you mean if it's put first.

(Note that there are some exceptions in Europe, like Hungary and Lithuania.)

A good summary can be found here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Date_format_by_country
 
Last edited:

Rover_KE

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jun 20, 2010
Member Type
Retired English Teacher
Native Language
English
Home Country
England
Current Location
England
I take your point, bubbha, but the first occasions when I saw this format were holiday confirmation dates from three different vacation resorts in Orlando, Florida.
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
Staff member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
Japan
It makes sense to me as it will label files by year first.
 

GoesStation

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Dec 22, 2015
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
I, personally, am not bothered which order the slots come in. Most of us have enough brain cells to work out what we need to fill in under dd, mm, yyyy, whichever order they come in. I much prefer dealing with dates in this way to scrolling down frustrating drop-down menus.
For the first twelve days of a month, dd/mm (as used in many sensible places) and mm/dd (the format we proudly adhere to in the USA) are ambiguous. I was delighted to discover when I lived in Canada that, although the logical dd/mm/yy format was most common, the American mm/dd/yy format was often found, too. A little imprecision lends spice to life, eh?

For the OP, I would not use slashes in the format you suggest. If you use hyphens, 2017-12-19 will almost certainly be understood everywhere as YYYY-MM-DD.
 
Top