What is "between jobs"???

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blacknomi

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:smilecol: :smilecol:
Hello,

He is between jobs.

What does he mean?
1. He has more than 2 jobs now. So he must be busy.
2. There are some job opportunities, he's considering which one to
choose.
3. He is a student but he has a part-time job.


Help Help Help~
Thanks


sabrina
:smilecol: :smilecol:
 

Red5

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:hi: If someone is "between jobs", it means they are currently unemployed. It means they are between having their last job (which has ended) and having their new job (which has yet to start). ;-)
 

blacknomi

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Red5 said:
:hi: If someone is "between jobs", it means they are currently unemployed. It means they are between having their last job (which has ended) and having their new job (which has yet to start). ;-)


:smilecol: :smilecol:
Dear Webmaster,

About your last sentence, I'm confusing.

I think the sentence should be

--> It means they are between having their last job (which has ended) and having their new job (which has not yet to start).

because you mentioned in the first sentence which means they don't have jobs currently.

Is my logic rite?

sabrina
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MikeNewYork

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blacknomi said:
Red5 said:
:hi: If someone is "between jobs", it means they are currently unemployed. It means they are between having their last job (which has ended) and having their new job (which has yet to start). ;-)


:smilecol: :smilecol:
Dear Webmaster,

About your last sentence, I'm confusing.

I think the sentence should be

--> It means they are between having their last job (which has ended) and having their new job (which has not yet to start).

because you mentioned in the first sentence which means they don't have jobs currently.

Is my logic rite?

sabrina
:smilecol: :smilecol:

The original phrase is correct. "Has yet to start" means "has not yet started".
 

MikeNewYork

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blacknomi said:
Danke schoen, Mike.


:wink: sabrina :wink:

You're welcome. +|;-)
 

henry

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blacknomi said:
Danke schoen, Mike.


:wink: sabrina :wink:

Hallo, Sabrina

Wie geht's dir? Kann ich was fragen-und zwar bist du Deutsche?

Best regards,

Henry

:D
 

blacknomi

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henry said:
Hallo, Sabrina

Wie geht's dir? Kann ich was fragen-und zwar bist du Deutsche?

Best regards,

Henry

:D


Wie geht's,Henry
Ich heisse nicht Deutsche. I learn a bit Deutsch.

sabrina :hi:
 

blacknomi

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MikeNewYork said:
The original phrase is correct. "Has yet to start" means "has not yet started".


Can I say 'He is in between jobs' ?



:roll: sabrina
 

MikeNewYork

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blacknomi said:
MikeNewYork said:
The original phrase is correct. "Has yet to start" means "has not yet started".


Can I say 'He is in between jobs' ?



:roll: sabrina

You could, but that would change the meaning. I would read that as a guy with two jobs or two tasks and he is in between working on one and the other.
 

MW

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It could mean unemployed or it could mean commuting or commute time between two consecutive jobs in the same day.
 

blacknomi

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This is a good reviewing class, I almost get confused again. Is there any medical supplements that can make learning etched in my memory? 8)


MW said:
It could mean unemployed or
I'm not between jobs.

MW said:
it could mean commuting or commute time between two consecutive jobs in the same day.
I teach dancing. I am a part-time actress. I am also a part-time translator. I am in between jobs.


Am I on the right track?
 

MW

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Am I on the right track? Are you a train?

Oh, another idiom! Yes you are!
 
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