what the data say

GoodTaste

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When pronouncing "what the data say", how do you transfer from "what" to "the"? /wɒt/- /ðə/ - from "t" to "ð" there seems to be some difficulty to sound both clearly.

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Face masks: what the data say
The science supports that face coverings are saving lives during the coronavirus pandemic, and yet the debate trundles on. How much evidence is enough?

Source: Nature 06 OCTOBER 2020
https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-020-02801-8
 

GoodTaste

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We don't release the /t/.

Does it mena /t/ can be omitted? Or does it mean /t/ is still there for a very, very short time?
 

GoodTaste

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It means that the tongue stops the airflow from the lungs at the alveolar ridge, but is not released until the onset of the /ðə/. The explosive /t/ that we hear in, for example, 'letter' is not heard.


I understand "not released until the onset of the /ðə/" as "not released until the onset of the /ðə/ - at this moment, /t/ and /ð/ will be released at the same time."

So it sounds more difficult to pronounce: How could /t/ and /ð/ be sounded at the same time? When I pronounced "what the data say" slowly, Google recognized my voice with 100% accuracy. When I read it aloud fast, it fails to discern it.
 

GoesStation

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/ð/ is a voiced phoneme. The preceding /t/ stops the flow of air, which resumes when you pronounce the /ð/. It's not difficult for a native speaker.
 
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