what's the word?

Status
Not open for further replies.

light

Member
Joined
Dec 20, 2005
Member Type
Other
hello,
let's say you've been buying a certain type of coffee brand for a long time. then you discover some unhygienic facts about that coffee brand and you don't want to buy it any more. what is this feeling called? I'm not looking for disgust but something more like feeling cold.

thank you in advance..
 

Ouisch

Key Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2006
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
Maybe "turned off"?


"I used to love Cafe Nervosa's special Kenya blend of coffee, until I saw that TV news report that showed rats running around in the processing plant. Now I'm completely turned off of that brand."
 

light

Member
Joined
Dec 20, 2005
Member Type
Other
thank you Quisch;

"Now I'm completely turned off of that brand."

Is of necessary here or can we omit it?
 

tedtmc

Key Member
Joined
Jun 12, 2006
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
Chinese
Home Country
Malaysia
Current Location
Malaysia
You can also say 'put off'.

not a teacher
 

David L.

VIP Member
Joined
Nov 7, 2007
Member Type
Other
'put off' just means 'discouraged, dissuaded' which doesn't carry the same intensity of rejection of the product.
 

tedtmc

Key Member
Joined
Jun 12, 2006
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
Chinese
Home Country
Malaysia
Current Location
Malaysia
'put off' just means 'discouraged, dissuaded' which doesn't carry the same intensity of rejection of the product.


OK, how about 'repelled' for intensity of rejection?
 

light

Member
Joined
Dec 20, 2005
Member Type
Other
What about this?

(context: I used to like 'X brand but smth happened and I don't like it anymore)

"I went off X after I heard some rumours about.."
 

buggles

Key Member
Joined
Aug 20, 2007
Member Type
Other
Native Language
British English
Home Country
England
Current Location
England
thank you Quisch;

"Now I'm completely turned off of that brand."

Is of necessary here or can we omit it?

You can and should leave out the of if you are using English English rather than American English.
 

buggles

Key Member
Joined
Aug 20, 2007
Member Type
Other
Native Language
British English
Home Country
England
Current Location
England
If you wanted an idiomatic expression, you could say,

" I wouldn't touch it with a barge-pole!"

or

" I wouldn't have it if it was given to me."

Buggles (not a teacher)
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top