When everyone was asleep

Bassim

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I am wondering if my sentence is grammatically correct.

When everyone was asleep, Peter went to kitchen, opened the fridge and gorged himself on everything he could find inside, from burgers, cheese to ice cream.
 

emsr2d2

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Problem: ice cream isn't kept in a fridge. It's kept in a freezer!

Usually "from ... to" connects just two things so I'd remove cheese from the equation and change ice cream to a different food that you would find in a fridge. I would also probably add the definite article before each food because you're being specific about the foods that were in the fridge.

With "When everyone was asleep", did you mean "Once he was sure everyone was asleep" or "While everyone was sleeping"?
 

Bassim

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I meant "while everyone was sleeping."
So I should actually start my sentence like this:

While everyone was sleeping, Peter went to kitchen.."
 

emsr2d2

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I meant "while everyone was sleeping."
So I should actually start my sentence like this:

While everyone was sleeping, Peter went to the kitchen (space before an ellipsis) ... (three dots in an ellipsis)"

Yes, or "While everyone was asleep, ..."
 

Bassim

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I will rephrase my sentence like this:

While everyone was sleeping, Peter went to the kitchen, opened the fridge and gorged himself on everything he found inside: sausages, burgers, cheese and boiled eggs.
 

emsr2d2

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As long as that was absolutely everything in the fridge, it's fine. If he left anything behind, then you can't use "everything".

Also, boiled eggs aren't usually kept in the fridge either. Hard-boiled eggs are. Boiled eggs are cooked until the white is set but the yolk is still runny and are generally eaten straight away while they're hot. Hard-boiled eggs are cooked until the yolk is set too and they can either be eaten straight away or stored in the fridge, in their shells, to be eaten later.
 

Bassim

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emsr2d2,

Thank you again. I believed that boiled eggs and hard-boiled eggs mean the same in English. I made this mistake because when I wrote the sentence I thought in my own language. We use just "boiled eggs" which can mean hard-boiled and boiled eggs. I have to train my mind to think in English when I write English sentences if I want to write correct English.
 

Tdol

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Do you need himself after gorged?
 

Bassim

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I think I don't need it.
 

emsr2d2

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It is certainly optional. I left it there because it's what I would say.

I am so full. I absolutely gorged myself on pizza earlier. I can barely move.
My friend and I just got back from a food festival. We gorged ourselves on free bread, cheese and prosecco. I think I might explode!
 

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In careful American English, what we used to call "hard-boiled eggs" are now called hard-cooked eggs. Eggs which are cooked in hot water until the whites set but the yolks are still runny are soft-boiled eggs.​ We never use the expression "boiled eggs" without further qualification.
 
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