which is correct ?

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MR.K

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which sentence is grammaticaly correct:

they have got a headache .

or

they have a headache .

and why ??
 
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in my opinion you have to say:
you have got a headache...
I am in a British school and there everybody says "have got".

But in America you can say:
you have a headache.

with best wishes

Miss Solero Exotic;-)
 

banderas

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which sentence is grammaticaly correct:

they have got a headache .

or

they have a headache .

and why ??


When have is used to speak about possession, relationships and other states, it is possible to use both have and have got:
I have a house in the country.
I have got a house in the country.
I don’t have any brothers or sisters.
I haven’t got any brothers or sisters.
Do you have a cold?
Have you got a cold?
have vs have got english grammar learn english
They have got a headache might (but I don't think it does) incline that a while ago they were fine but now they have (just) got a headache.
 

daznorthants

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Then again they being more than one person:

They have got headaches.
They have headaches.

either works
 

naomimalan

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They have got a headache might (but I don't think it does) incline that a while ago they were fine but now they have (just) got a headache.

I think American English can make this distinction but not British English. In American English, to convey the above meaning you would say "They have gotten headaches." (gotten as opposed to got). :-D:-D
 

MR.K

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thank you all

but , if I find it in exam which one should I choose ??
 

banderas

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I think American English can make this distinction but not British English. In American English, to convey the above meaning you would say "They have gotten headaches." (gotten as opposed to got). :-D:-D
hi Naomimalan,

How do we say in British English "I have gotten a headache"? (so that it does not mean "I have a headache"?);-)
 

banderas

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so , what shall I choose ?

heve OR have got
Sorry, It seems that I confused the threads...;-)

Both are fine, I do not think you will be asked to choose one of them as a correct answer.
Have you come across such a situation in tests?
 
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jctgf

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Hi there,
I think I know what Mr. K is concerned about.
If he's a foreigner like me, maybe he's overwhelmed with so many possibilities and just want to "work under a basic configuration", like me...
Regards
 

MR.K

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Hi there,
I think I know what Mr. K is concerned about.
If he's a foreigner like me, maybe he's overwhelmed with so many possibilities and just want to "work under a basic configuration", like me...
Regards

HI
i am not native speaker of English language , so

I want to know if i had an exam which one that I should to choose ??
 

MR.K

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I Hope From Any One To Help Me
 
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naomimalan

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hi Naomimalan,

How do we say in British English "I have gotten a headache"? (so that it does not mean "I have a headache"?);-)

As I suggested a bit higher up, American English can make this distinction but I don’t think British English can – unless one chooses another verb. For example:
I’ve got a cold = I have a cold
I’ve caught a cold = I’ve gotten a cold

But with the headache example I can’t think of an alternative verb (and you can’t say I’ve caught a headache.)
Here you’d have to resort to a circumlocution like A moment ago I was feeling fine but now I’ve got a headache.:-D:-D
 

naomimalan

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so , what shall I choose ?

heve OR have got

What Banderas says higher up is perfectly true: "Both are fine, I do not think you will be asked to choose one of them as a correct answer.
Have you come across such a situation in tests?"

Honestly Mr. K, as Banderas suggests, either one is perfectly acceptable. And no examiner in his right mind will ever ask you to choose between one or the other.
 

MR.K

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What Banderas says higher up is perfectly true: "Both are fine, I do not think you will be asked to choose one of them as a correct answer.
Have you come across such a situation in tests?"

Honestly Mr. K, as Banderas suggests, either one is perfectly acceptable. And no examiner in his right mind will ever ask you to choose between one or the other.

THANKS ALOT FOR HELPING ME ><><
 
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