Which is the most irregular verb?

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Tdol

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RonBee

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It is quite a coincidence to see this here after what I recently posted on the subject. It makes me wonder where you got the idea from.

:wink:
 

Tdol

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No coincidence, Ron, I stole it shamelessly from you. ;-)
 

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Tdol

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yulia

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Guys, it's really incredible. I've just printed out the full list of Irregular Verbs. The total quantity is 281. Is that all? Or maybe there some more of them? It's really incredible! So many!
Though I ticked "be", still I'm not confident that it's correct as I don't really know.
 

Casiopea

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yulia said:
Guys, it's really incredible. I've just printed out the full list of Irregular Verbs. The total quantity is 281. Is that all? Or maybe there some more of them? It's really incredible! So many!
Though I ticked "be", still I'm not confident that it's correct as I don't really know.

Forms of "can": can, could
Forms of "do": do, did, does
Forms of "be": be, is, are, am, was, were (check) :D
 
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yulia

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Casiopea said:
yulia said:
Guys, it's really incredible. I've just printed out the full list of Irregular Verbs. The total quantity is 281. Is that all? Or maybe there some more of them? It's really incredible! So many!
Though I ticked "be", still I'm not confident that it's correct as I don't really know.

Forms of "can": can, could
Forms of "do": do, did, does
Forms of "be": be, is, are, am, was, were (check) :D

I now the forms fo these verbs.
Thanks anyway :wink:
 

Casiopea

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yulia said:
Casiopea said:
yulia said:
Guys, it's really incredible. I've just printed out the full list of Irregular Verbs. The total quantity is 281. Is that all? Or maybe there some more of them? It's really incredible! So many!
Though I ticked "be", still I'm not confident that it's correct as I don't really know.

Forms of "can": can, could
Forms of "do": do, did, does
Forms of "be": be, is, are, am, was, were (check) :D

I now the forms fo these verbs.
Thanks anyway :wink:

:D You wrote, "Though I ticked 'be', still I'm not confident that it's correct as I don't really know", and so I listed the verb forms for you to see that you were correct in picking "be". If you count the forms for can, do, and be, you'll see that "be" has way more variants than can and do. You can be confident now in your choice of "be". You are correct. :D
 
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yulia

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RonBee said:
It is quite a coincidence to see this here after what I recently posted on the subject. It makes me wonder where you got the idea from.

:wink:

Could you, pls, explain me one thing. In the list of irregular verbs, there are two forms for Past Simple & Partciple 1 for some of the verbs. What for these two forms are given & how to know which one to use? Because sometimes these two forms are absolutely differrent. :wink:
 

Casiopea

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yulia said:
RonBee said:
It is quite a coincidence to see this here after what I recently posted on the subject. It makes me wonder where you got the idea from.

:wink:

Could you, pls, explain me one thing. In the list of irregular verbs, there are two forms for Past Simple & Partciple 1 for some of the verbs. What for these two forms are given & how to know which one to use? Because sometimes these two forms are absolutely differrent. :wink:

They are listed like this, right?

Past tense, ate; Perfect, eaten

1. Use the Past tense form when you are talking about one event/action in the past, like this,

I ate dinner yesterday. (Past)

2. Use the Prefect form in four ways:

A. with 'have/has' when you want to express an event/action taking place in the past and continuing up unit right now, like this,

I have eaten dinner. (Present Perfect)

B. with 'had' when you want to connect two events/actions in the past, like this,

I had eaten dinner before you called. (Past Perfect)

Note that, the event/action that happened first takes 'had -en/-ed', like this,

Event #1: I had eaten dinner
Event #2: you called

C. with passive voice, like this,

I ate a banana (active voice)
A banana was eaten. (passive voice)

D. as an adjective to modify nouns,

A half-eaten banana was in my bag. ('banana' is a noun and 'eaten' functions as an adjective telling us what kind of banana.)

All the best, :D
 
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yulia

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Casiopea said:
yulia said:
RonBee said:
It is quite a coincidence to see this here after what I recently posted on the subject. It makes me wonder where you got the idea from.

:wink:

Could you, pls, explain me one thing. In the list of irregular verbs, there are two forms for Past Simple & Partciple 1 for some of the verbs. What for these two forms are given & how to know which one to use? Because sometimes these two forms are absolutely differrent. :wink:

They are listed like this, right?

Past tense, ate; Perfect, eaten

1. Use the Past tense form when you are talking about one event/action in the past, like this,

I ate dinner yesterday. (Past)

2. Use the Prefect form in four ways:

A. with 'have/has' when you want to express an event/action taking place in the past and continuing up unit right now, like this,

I have eaten dinner. (Present Perfect)

B. with 'had' when you want to connect two events/actions in the past, like this,

I had eaten dinner before you called. (Past Perfect)

Note that, the event/action that happened first takes 'had -en/-ed', like this,

Event #1: I had eaten dinner
Event #2: you called

C. with passive voice, like this,

I ate a banana (active voice)
A banana was eaten. (passive voice)

D. as an adjective to modify nouns,

A half-eaten banana was in my bag. ('banana' is a noun and 'eaten' functions as an adjective telling us what kind of banana.)

All the best, :D

I, actually, didn't mean that. I meant that sometimes there are tow forms of the irregular verbs, like the following:

Past Simple Past Participle
went gone/been - ?
kneeled/knelt kneeled/knelt
forecast/forecasted forecast/forecasted
learnt/learned learnt/learned

And so on. How do I know when I should use for Past Simple one of these two forms, or when I should use one of these two forms for Present Perfect?
For instance, I can say: I've been to Madrid or I've gone to Madrid. But if I use either of the forms, the meaning will be different for each of them.
OOr for instance. I can say the following: I've learnt so much., or I've learned so much. What will be the difference between these two forms?

I hope that now you got my point.

Thanks in advance.
 

Casiopea

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yulia said:
Past Simple Past Participle
went gone/been
kneeled/knelt kneeled/knelt
forecast/forecasted forecast/forecasted
learnt/learned learnt/learned

How do I know when I should use for Past Simple one of these two forms, or when I should use one of these two forms for Present Perfect?

The slash (/) means, either variant is acceptable; The difference is usually attributed to spelling, especially -ed and -t variants; as for, gone/been, well, they are near synonyms:

I have gone (I've been there)
I have been (I've gone)

All the best, :D
 
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yulia

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Casiopea said:
yulia said:
Past Simple Past Participle
went gone/been
kneeled/knelt kneeled/knelt
forecast/forecasted forecast/forecasted
learnt/learned learnt/learned

How do I know when I should use for Past Simple one of these two forms, or when I should use one of these two forms for Present Perfect?

The slash (/) means, either variant is acceptable; The difference is usually attributed to spelling, especially -ed and -t variants; as for, gone/been, well, they are near synonyms:

I have gone (I've been there)
I have been (I've gone)

All the best, :D


Thanks!
No I got it now.
 

Tdol

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yulia said:
Guys, it's really incredible. I've just printed out the full list of Irregular Verbs. The total quantity is 281. Is that all? Or maybe there some more of them? It's really incredible! So many!

When we think of others, we add them to the list, but I think we have covered the most common ones. ;-)
 
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yulia

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tdol said:
yulia said:
Guys, it's really incredible. I've just printed out the full list of Irregular Verbs. The total quantity is 281. Is that all? Or maybe there some more of them? It's really incredible! So many!

When we think of others, we add them to the list, but I think we have covered the most common ones. ;-)

:wink: My God! What do you mean "when we think of others"? Isn't that a full list? Then how many more of them are there?
By the way, is it allowed to begin the sentence in English from "and", like, "And after I had found that out..."?
 

Casiopea

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yulia said:
By the way, is it allowed to begin the sentence in English from "and", like, "And after I had found that out..."?

Writing 911.com said:
Seven Outdated Grammar Rules
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Rule #3
Starting a sentence with a conjunction can help transition from one idea to another or add a dramatic tone to a passage. If you start sentences this way too often, your paragraphs will sound like one long run-on sentence. Use conjunctions at the start of sentences judiciously.

All the best, :D
 

Tdol

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yulia said:
tdol said:
yulia said:
Guys, it's really incredible. I've just printed out the full list of Irregular Verbs. The total quantity is 281. Is that all? Or maybe there some more of them? It's really incredible! So many!

When we think of others, we add them to the list, but I think we have covered the most common ones. ;-)

:wink: My God! What do you mean "when we think of others"? Isn't that a full list? Then how many more of them are there?
By the way, is it allowed to begin the sentence in English from "and", like, "And after I had found that out..."?

We're down to tracking the obscure ones.

Yes, you can start a sentence with a conjunction, but don't overdo it. Do it for a reason. ;-)
 

RonBee

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1. What Cas said. :wink:
2. I don't think we will be adding any more to the list of irregular verbs. The most common ones (and some rather uncommon ones) are already there.

:)
 
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