which one is correct?

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light

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hello,

which of the following sentences is correct? and why?

a) "The thing which I most dislike about her is her..."

b) "The thing which I dislike the most about her is her..."

c) "The thing which I dislike most about her is her ..."
 

svartnik

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hello,

which of the following sentences is correct? and why?

a) "The thing which I [STRIKE]most[/STRIKE] dislike most about her is her..."

b) "The thing which I dislike the most about her is her..."

c) "The thing which I dislike most about her is her ..."

b = c = correct
 

ahongmeng

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;-)How to encourage the students to use more English in the classroom?
 

Clark

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thank you but why?
and 'the' has no function?

'The' is optional with superlative adverbs modifying verb phrases. Even if 'the' is omitted in such constructions, the meaning it carries is implied.
 

Clark

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Does it matter? ;-) I am not a prescriptive grammarian.

Svartnik, no offence meant but prescriptivists are exactly grammatical scholars who believe that the only purpose of grammar is to give strict rules of writing and speaking correctly. It is descriptivists who like to analyse and explain things.:-D
 

svartnik

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Svartnik, no offence meant but prescriptivists are exactly grammatical scholars who believe that the only purpose of grammar is to give strict rules of writing and speaking correctly. It is descriptivists who like to analyse and explain things.:-D

:oops: :up:
 

light

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svartnik,
I do hope you are not a teacher of english, because only in that case you can be excused.

also, you can be a native speaker, then you are excused too because natives acquire their mother tongue, not learn it so they (let's say most of them) have no idea of the rules behind the language. the same thing applies to me too, a filipino friend of mine, trying to learn my languge, asks such awkward questions that, I just simply say "god I don't know the answer".

but,mind you, learning a language is diffrent from acquiring it. we, learners, need a set of rules to rely on, a set of explanations which make sense. otherwise we just memorize structures,just like disciples believing in set of "so called" religious rules without questioning them; dogmatism kills knowledge and improvement. that's what I believe.

once, while I was trying to learn how to drive, my instructor told me to step on the clutch pedal if I wanted to change the gear. I did it only after he explained the function of the clutches (well I made him explain:). because otherwise it didn't make any sense to me. do this, do that. I need to know why.

as a constant learner I always ask why. I need to know. I hate memorizing chunks. give me the rules, I make the generalization and usage comes next.

so you ask "does it matter?" yes, it matters actually.

clark:
thank you for the "the" explanation :)
 

svartnik

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svartnik,
I do hope you are not a teacher of english, because only in that case you can be excused.

Could you explain why? :lol:
Excused? Are you sure it is the right word for someone who devoted his time trying to sort out your problem?

"I do hope you are not a teacher of English, because only in that case can you be excused."
 
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light

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thank you svartnik for correcting my mistakes in my english sentence.

by the way, there is a saying here, dunno who said it:

"small men deal with people, ordinary men deal with events, but great men deal with ideas."
 

Searching for language

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Svartnik, no offence meant but prescriptivists are exactly grammatical scholars who believe that the only purpose of grammar is to give strict rules of writing and speaking correctly. It is descriptivists who like to analyse and explain things.:-D

Oh my goodness, I had no idea that there was a name for this affliction that I have about proper grammar and speaking. I thought all this time that I was just annoying to other people. :-D
 

anselmo

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the last option is the best. It sounds quiet good.
 

svartnik

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there is a saying here, dunno who said it:

"small men deal with people, ordinary men deal with events, but great men deal with ideas."

Thank you for your pearls of wisdom, Aristotle. :lol::up:
Which group do you belong, Light? :up:
 
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svartnik

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'The' is optional with superlative adverbs modifying verb phrases. Even if 'the' is omitted in such constructions, the meaning it carries is implied.

Light, this is still just a qualitative observation. What Clark quoted from an authority is still just an account that describes but not explains.
Why? What does it mean 'why'?
Did you want a reason why the omission of 'the' is optional? Or did you want a rule from an authority?
What Clark quoted is my words phrased in grammatical terms, nothing more, nothing less.
 
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Clark

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Light, this is still just a qualitative observation. What Clark quoted from an authority is still just an account that describes but not explains.
Why? What does it mean 'why'?
Did you want a reason why the omission of 'the' is optional? Or did you want a rule from an authority?
What Clark quoted is my words phrased in grammatical terms, nothing more, nothing less.

'The' is optional with superlative adverbs modifying verb phrases. Even if 'the' is omitted in such constructions, the meaning it carries is implied.

The first sentence was quoted from 'Cambridge grammar of English' by C.McCarthy, the second one is my own.

Why are words sometimes omitted? First of all, because they can easily be supplied from context, secondly, people won't make efforts if they can avoid it. As a result of that, one of the basic principles of language is economy with the means of expression.

Why is the definite article used with the superlative degree of an adverb or adjective? Because this superlative degree form expresses the idea of limitation, making the object or action they modify distinct from all the other objects/actions of the group.
 
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svartnik

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'The' is optional with superlative adverbs modifying verb phrases. Even if 'the' is omitted in such constructions, the meaning it carries is implied.

The first sentence was quoted from 'Cambridge grammar of English' by C.McCarthy, the second one is my own.

Why are words sometimes omitted? First of all, because they can easily be supplied from context, secondly, people won't make efforts if they can avoid it. As a result of that, one of the basic principles of language is economy with the means of expression.

Why is the definite article used with the superlative degree of an adverb or adjective? Because this superlative degree form expresses the idea of limitation, making the object or action they modify distinct from all the other objects/actions of the group.

Now is the question of 'why?' answered. Thanks Clark. What confuses me why light was satisfied with your previous explanation, when it was not any more than mine, except that it was couched in grammatical terminology. I hope you understand me and that you do not misunderstand me. :up:
 

Clark

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Now is the question of 'why?' answered. Thanks Clark. What confuses me why light was satisfied with your previous explanation, when it was not any more than mine, except that it was couched in grammatical terminology. I hope you understand me and that you do not misunderstand me. :up:

Well, have a look at your "explanation":

"Originally Posted by light
thank you but why?

Does it matter? I am not a prescriptive grammarian.

Quote:Originally Posted by light
and 'the' has no function?

Nothing that I know of. "


From my experience of teaching grown-ups, I know that they, unlike children, have difficulty in memorizing things they do not understand. When they ask why, they don't actually expect you to go deep into linguistics. Not being linguists themselves, they will find it hard to understand sophisticated things. They just want you to give them a very clear rule saying how to use this or that form correctly, and minimal 'philosophy' if there's a need to distinguish between synonymous grammatical structures in order to use them adequately.
But you can't just say: 'Use 'the' with this noun'. They will immediately ask 'Why?' , 'Do we always have to use 'the' with it?', 'What about other words like this one?', etc. Their critical mind censor won't let the information pass unless it has been logically processed.
 
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