which sentence is correct?

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Jenny Lau

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1 It's there where you put it.
2 It's where you put it .
Which sentence is correct? And why?
Another question:
What's the difference beteen "Anyone who" and "whoever"?
 

RonBee

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1 It's there where you put it.
2 It's where you put it .
Which sentence is correct? And why?

Both are correct. The difference is that the first sentence seems to be talking about a specific place.

Another question:
What's the difference between "Anyone who" and "whoever"?

"Anyone who wants to come may come."
"Whoever wants to come may come."

I don't see any difference between the two. (Perhaps someone else will offer an additional comment or two.)
 

Lib

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I agree with Ronbee, in both cases.
If you say, 'it's there where you put it', you are probably pointing at 'it'. If you say, 'it's where you put it', maybe 'it' is not in the same room, so you can't point at it.

I don't see any difference between the second pair of sentences either. Maybe 'anyone' without 'who' can have more uses than 'whoever':
A: I don't understand this exercise.
B: It's very easy! Anyone could do it.
In this case you can't use 'whoever'.
Could it be that 'anyone who' and 'whoever' mean: the person / people who?
Comments?
 

Jenny Lau

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Thank you, Ronbee and Lib. I am quite clear about these two questions now. And I think there are no differences between "anyone who" and "whoever". Thanks again :)
 

Tdol

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I think 'It's there where you put it' could be used to tell someone that something has not been moved. ;-)
 

RonBee

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tdol said:
I think 'It's there where you put it' could be used to tell someone that something has been moved. ;-)

It could also be used to tell them that it hasn't been moved.

:wink:
 

Jenny Lau

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I find a problem concerning this problem:
____ knows the thuth will tell you about it.
A no matter who B whoever
The answer is B, but I don't know why A is not right? And is the answer right?
 

RonBee

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"Whoever knows the truth will tell you about it."

The word whoever in that sentence means the person that. The word "whoever" is a pronoun that does not refer to a specific person.
 

RonBee

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In my opinion, "no matter who" cannot operate as a pronoun. Also, while it is an expression that is often used, it is always part of a longer expression. The expressions in which it appears are, I think, generally adverbial phrases. It cannot replace whoever..

But the fact is, bullies are bad no matter who they are!
http://www.zdnet.com/anchordesk/talkback/talkback_210990.html

No matter who steers, the wheels of justice turn
http://www.sptimes.com/2003/05/14/Columns/No_matter_who_steers_.shtml

No matter who loses, his supporters will feel robbed. And no matter who is chosen, those who feel robbed will be right.
http://www.lollie.com/gallery/whowins.html

No Matter Who Wins an Election, You Still Lose
http://www.geocities.com/decriminalizefreedom/voting.html

No Matter Who Sits In A Director's Chair It Needs To Be A Class Act
http://securities.stanford.edu/news-archive/2003/20030509_Headline10_Gettler.htm

It's my house, no matter who owns it
http://www.csmonitor.com/2003/0409/p15s01-lign.htm

Justice Will Lose No Matter Who Wins
http://www.griffnews.com/droleskey/001113.shtml
 

Tdol

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RonBee said:
tdol said:
I think 'It's there where you put it' could be used to tell someone that something has been moved. ;-)

It could also be used to tell them that it hasn't been moved.

:wink:

I'm sorry- I missed the negative. I meant the opposite of what I posted. I have edited it. Thanks for pointing it out to me. ;-((((((
 

RonBee

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No problem.

:wink:
 

Tdol

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Jenny Lau

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Ronbee, thank you for giving me so many examples, I totally understand now, and thank you Lib and Tdol.
 

RonBee

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You're quite welcome. (That phrase ("no matter who") is not one I use everyday, so I had to look it up.)

:)
 

Tdol

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'No matter who' is common enough in BE. ;-)
 

RonBee

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tdol said:
'No matter who' is common enough in BE. ;-)

It's common enough in AE too. A Google search for that phrase yielded 235,000 hits.
 

Tdol

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J

jwschang

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Jenny Lau said:
1 It's there where you put it.
2 It's where you put it .
Which sentence is correct? And why?
Another question:
What's the difference beteen "Anyone who" and "whoever"?
8)

Re your first question,
1. Meaning of both can be the same, or slightly different, depending on spoken emphasis.
2. Sentence 1 is: It's + adverb (there) + adverb (where you put it).
3. Sentence 2 is: It's + adverb (where you put it).
4. Students are usually taught that "an adverb modifies a VERB". The adverb does more than this: It tells more about a VERB, or an ADJECTIVE, or another ADVERB (e.g. the adverb phrase "where you put it" tells more about "there", as in Sentence 1).
 
J

jwschang

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[/quote]Could it be that 'anyone who' and 'whoever' mean: the person / people who?
Comments?[/quote]

For example,
1. "Anyone who asks me....": "Who" is used as a relative pronoun that refers to and DEFINES/RESTRICTS the meaning of "anyone".
2. "Whoever asks me....". "Whoever" is an indefinite pronoun used in the nominative case.
3. Difference is: "Anyone" begs for a defining clause to follow it (you don't say "Anyone asks me...."); "Whoever" is indefinite but gets defined by what follows within the same clause.
4. When "anyone" is defined by the relative pronoun "who" introducing a restrictive clause, it means exactly the same thing as "Whoever" being defined by "asks me" within the clause comprising them.
(a) Anyone + (clause headed by "who").
(b) "Whoever" heads the clause "Whoever asks me...".

To make the above clearer, "Anyone who" = "Whoever"
 
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