Which sounds more vulger?

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Taka

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Which word sounds more vulger, "bullshit" or "baloney"?
 

RonBee

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The first one sounds more vulgar.

:)
 

Tdol

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I agree with Ron. ;-)
 

Taka

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Tdol

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You're welcome. Interesting 'bullshit' in British English is less vulgar than 'shit'. ;-)
 

Taka

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One more thing to ask.

Please read the story here (the same story I asked about before):

http://www.chickensoup.com/books/soup_2_sample_01.html

About "I told her that I did good things all the time, and all I got in return was "baloney!" (I didn"t use that word.)", I thought that the author actually used more vulgar words than "baloney", such as "bullshit", to describe what he had gotten in return to his /her grandmother.

Is my interpretation correct?
 

Tdol

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I'd suggest that the author used a less vulgar word because they have enclosed it in inverted commas here to show it's a slang expression. ;-)
 

Taka

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tdol said:
I'd suggest that the author used a less vulgar word because they have enclosed it in inverted commas here to show it's a slang expression. ;-)

To tdol

According to The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language: Fourth Edition.  2000., the etymology of baloney is an "alteration (influenced by baloney-sausge) of bullshit". Also, you and RonBee said "baloney" is less vulgar than "bullshit". So I thought the author used "bullshit" or the same kind of other mean words in reality, but due to convention of publication ethics (you know what I mean ^_^), he/she might have "altered" the original word into "baloney", which is much softer and better for its publication.

Am I wrong??
 

Tdol

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Given the nature of the book,I think the writer might think 'baloney'is not the kind of word you use in front of grandma. I could be wrong, though. Americans are generally more uptight about rude words than the British, which is why I suggested this. It's hard to say for certain which is correct. The use of 'this' word, IMO, suggests he thought baloney too strong. If he wanted to imply 'bullshit', 'that word' might be more accurate.
 

Taka

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tdol said:
Given the nature of the book,I think the writer might think 'baloney'is not the kind of word you use in front of grandma. I could be wrong, though. Americans are generally more uptight about rude words than the British, which is why I suggested this. It's hard to say for certain which is correct. The use of 'this' word, IMO, suggests he thought baloney too strong. If he wanted to imply 'bullshit', 'that word' might be more accurate.

OK. Thanks tdol. And I wait for another comments for an American to make it clearer.
 

RonBee

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"Baloney" is one of those words a person might use if he thinks something is BS. It's an expression of disapproval. A similar expression is, "What a crock!"

:wink:
 

Taka

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RonBee said:
"Baloney" is one of those words a person might use if he thinks something is BS. It's an expression of disapproval. A similar expression is, "What a crock!"

To RonBee

So, do you think "baloney" is almost equivalent to "bullshit" (did you mean this word by "BS"??) even though the word "baloney" is altered from "BS"?
 

RonBee

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Taka said:
RonBee said:
"Baloney" is one of those words a person might use if he thinks something is BS. It's an expression of disapproval. A similar expression is, "What a crock!"

To RonBee

So, do you think "baloney" is almost equivalent to "bullshit" (did you mean this word by "BS"??) even though the word "baloney" is altered from "BS"?

Yes. BS is short for bullshit. Baloney is a milder form of that word.

:)
 

Taka

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RonBee said:
Yes. BS is short for bullshit. Baloney is a milder form of that word.

Milder, but not to be used in front of the grandmother in the story?

Do you think tdol's interpretation is correct and mine is impossible, far from the author's intention?
 

RonBee

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Taka said:
RonBee said:
Yes. BS is short for bullshit. Baloney is a milder form of that word.

Milder, but not to be used in front of the grandmother in the story?

Do you think tdol's interpretation is correct and mine is impossible, far from the autor's intention?

It is hard for me to tell if he thinks grandma might have been offended by that word or if he thinks the reader might have been offended by the word he actually used. It seems to me that he might have said, "Grandma, I do nice things for people and all I get back is crap."

When he says "I didn’t use that word" that indicates to me that perhaps a somewhat coarser word was used. "Baloney" is pretty mild compared to some things.

:)
 

Taka

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Thank you very much RonBee!!
 

Tdol

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RonBee said:
"Baloney" is pretty mild compared to some things.

:)

It isn't used much in Tarantino films. ;-)
 

Taka

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tdol said:
It isn't used much in Tarantino films. ;-)

Ha-ha! That's right!!
 

Red5

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tdol said:
You're welcome. Interesting 'bullshit' in British English is less vulgar than 'shit'. ;-)

I would guess that's because it's disassociated from humans. :?
 
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Britain’s Advertising Standards Authority rejected a complaint about an ad insert in the educational supplement of The Times which referred to children as little ‘buggers’. As in: “Don’t Let the Buggers Get You Down”. It listed teaching guides produced by the London-based publisher Continuum, including: Getting the Buggers to Write; Getting the Buggers to Draw: Getting the Buggers to Think; Getting the Buggers into Languages; and Getting the Buggers to Add Up. The advertisers said the word was inoffensive when applied to a child, when it had the same meaning as ‘rogue scamp.”. -Sky News

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