which/with

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petertsui

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Are they both correct?

I found an apartment which has four rooms.
I found an apartment with four rooms.
 

izabela

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Hi,

Yes, they are both correct.

Iza

petertsui said:
Are they both correct?

I found an apartment which has four rooms.
I found an apartment with four rooms.
 

petertsui

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Thanks, Iza. :D

What about: I found an apartment that has four rooms. And which one sounds more natural to you in speech?

I prefer the second one, though.
 

Casiopea

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petertsui said:
Thanks, Iza. :D

What about: I found an apartment that has four rooms. And which one sounds more natural to you in speech?

I prefer the second one, though.

I found a one-room apartment. :wink:
I found a four-room apartment. :wink:
 

izabela

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Hi,

'That' is used more often.

I like Casiopea's suggestion; it's shorter and it conveys the same meaning.

Iza

petertsui said:
Thanks, Iza. :D

What about: I found an apartment that has four rooms. And which one sounds more natural to you in speech?

I prefer the second one, though.
 

MikeNewYork

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petertsui said:
Are they both correct?

I found an apartment which has four rooms.
I found an apartment with four rooms.

They are both correct in British English. In American English, we would use "that" instead of "which" in a restrictive clause. Both forms would use "which" in a nonrestrictive clause:

I found an apartment, which has four rooms.
 

petertsui

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Casiopea said:
petertsui said:
Thanks, Iza. :D

What about: I found an apartment that has four rooms. And which one sounds more natural to you in speech?

I prefer the second one, though.

I found a one-room apartment. :wink:
I found a four-room apartment. :wink:

Yes, a modifier does it better. :p
 

petertsui

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MikeNewYork said:
petertsui said:
Are they both correct?

I found an apartment which has four rooms.
I found an apartment with four rooms.

They are both correct in British English. In American English, we would use "that" instead of "which" in a restrictive clause. Both forms would use "which" in a nonrestrictive clause:

I found an apartment, which has four rooms.

Here we have:

I found an apartment which has four rooms.
I found an apartment with four rooms.
I found a four-room apartment.
I found an apartment, which has four rooms.

In a word, they all give the same meaning and are grammatically correct? :?:

Let me expand yours:

I found an apartment in California, which has four rooms, that overlooks the Golden Gate.

Does this one make sense? :roll:
 

petertsui

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izabela said:
Hi,

'That' is used more often.

I like Casiopea's suggestion; it's shorter and it conveys the same meaning.

Iza

petertsui said:
Thanks, Iza. :D

What about: I found an apartment that has four rooms. And which one sounds more natural to you in speech?

I prefer the second one, though.

Agree. :wink:
 

MikeNewYork

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petertsui said:
MikeNewYork said:
petertsui said:
Are they both correct?

I found an apartment which has four rooms.
I found an apartment with four rooms.

They are both correct in British English. In American English, we would use "that" instead of "which" in a restrictive clause. Both forms would use "which" in a nonrestrictive clause:

I found an apartment, which has four rooms.

Here we have:

I found an apartment which has four rooms.
I found an apartment with four rooms.
I found a four-room apartment.
I found an apartment, which has four rooms.

In a word, they all give the same meaning and are grammatically correct? :?:

Let me expand yours:

I found an apartment in California, which has four rooms, that overlooks the Golden Gate.

Does this one make sense? :roll:

Relative clauses should directly follow the noun they modify. This avoids confusion. In your sentence, it appears that California has four rooms.

In California, I found an apartment, which has four rooms, that overlooks the Golden Gate.

I found an apartment, which has four rooms, that overlooks California's Golden Gate.
 

petertsui

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Oh, yes. That's where I overlooked.

Then, how about this one:

I found a four-room apartment overlooking the Golden Gate in California.
 

Tdol

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Even better- hope you can afford it. :lol:
 

petertsui

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Thanks a lot for the guidance that you -- as well as Iza, Casiopea and Mike -- gave me.

Well, it's always a wish on the mind, but I really don't know if I could afford it -- at least not in the near future. :?

One more question:

Did I use the dash correctly?
 

MikeNewYork

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petertsui said:
Oh, yes. That's where I overlooked.

Then, how about this one:

I found a four-room apartment overlooking the Golden Gate in California.

That's great! :D
 

Tdol

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petertsui said:
Thanks a lot for the guidance that you -- as well as Iza, Casiopea and Mike -- gave me.

Well, it's always a wish on the mind, but I really don't know if I could afford it -- at least not in the near future. :?

One more question:

Did I use the dash correctly?

Yes, but it would be called a hyphen as it's joining two words. ;-)
 

MikeNewYork

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tdol said:
petertsui said:
Thanks a lot for the guidance that you -- as well as Iza, Casiopea and Mike -- gave me.

Well, it's always a wish on the mind, but I really don't know if I could afford it -- at least not in the near future. :?

One more question:

Did I use the dash correctly?

Yes, but it would be called a hyphen as it's joining two words. ;-)

There may be some confusion here. I think he was referring to the dashes in this post, not the hyphen in four-room. :?
 

petertsui

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tdol said:
petertsui said:
Thanks a lot for the guidance that you -- as well as Iza, Casiopea and Mike -- gave me.

Well, it's always a wish on the mind, but I really don't know if I could afford it -- at least not in the near future. :?

One more question:

Did I use the dash correctly?

Yes, but it would be called a hyphen as it's joining two words. ;-)

:oops: I know how a hyphen works, basically. Here I'm talking about the dashes in the first two sentences. What do you think?
 

petertsui

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MikeNewYork said:
tdol said:
petertsui said:
Thanks a lot for the guidance that you -- as well as Iza, Casiopea and Mike -- gave me.

Well, it's always a wish on the mind, but I really don't know if I could afford it -- at least not in the near future. :?

One more question:

Did I use the dash correctly?

Yes, but it would be called a hyphen as it's joining two words. ;-)

There may be some confusion here. I think he was referring to the dashes in this post, not the hyphen in four-room. :?

Exactly, Mike.

If not, what would the alternative(s) be? :?:
 

MikeNewYork

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petertsui said:
MikeNewYork said:
tdol said:
petertsui said:
Thanks a lot for the guidance that you -- as well as Iza, Casiopea and Mike -- gave me.

Well, it's always a wish on the mind, but I really don't know if I could afford it -- at least not in the near future. :?

One more question:

Did I use the dash correctly?

Yes, but it would be called a hyphen as it's joining two words. ;-)

There may be some confusion here. I think he was referring to the dashes in this post, not the hyphen in four-room. :?

Exactly, Mike.

If not, what would the alternative(s) be? :?:

One could use commas for the first one, but I think only the dash works well for the second. I prefer it for afterthoughts and tag statements. :wink:
 

petertsui

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MikeNewYork said:
petertsui said:
MikeNewYork said:
tdol said:
petertsui said:
Thanks a lot for the guidance that you -- as well as Iza, Casiopea and Mike -- gave me.

Well, it's always a wish on the mind, but I really don't know if I could afford it -- at least not in the near future. :?

One more question:

Did I use the dash correctly?

Yes, but it would be called a hyphen as it's joining two words. ;-)

There may be some confusion here. I think he was referring to the dashes in this post, not the hyphen in four-room. :?

Exactly, Mike.

If not, what would the alternative(s) be? :?:

One could use commas for the first one, but I think only the dash works well for the second. I prefer it for afterthoughts and tag statements. :wink:

Wonderful, Mike. Thanks so much for the clear-cut answer to my question. The use of "dash" is definitely not my forte. :cry:

Can you do me just one more favor? Give me some examples of how the dash is employed in "afterthoughts and tag statements", please. :wink:
 
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