Whirligig

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Love Teaching

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Hello,

The attached picture is a whirligig, isn't it?
Actually we want to mix this word (whirligig) with another word (thread) to make a new combination. It's a kind of whirligig in which thread is used. Is it correct to say "thread whirligig"?
Thanks.
 

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Rover_KE

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'Whirligig' appears to be the AmE word for what British children call windmills.

Click here to see pictures of windmills, though you have to scroll a long way down that page to find this — a similar
thing to the whirligig.

However, I don't understand what you mean by a 'thread whirligig'.

Rover
 
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Nicklexoxo

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Sorry, but can I call it a "whirligig" ?

6855927jl8.jpg
 

JMurray

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I would call that a "spinning top" or just a "top".
Google "spinning top image".
 

MikeNewYork

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'Whirligig' appears to be the AmE word for what British children call windmills.

Click here to see pictures of windmills, though you have to scroll a long way down that page to find this — a similar
thing to the whirligig.

However, I don't understand what you mean by a 'thread whirligig'.

Rover

In AmE, we also call them pinwheels.
 

Barb_D

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Yes, I'd call it a pinwheel.

I thought a "whirligig" was sort of like a "whatchamacallit"
 

Rover_KE

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[STRIKE]Sorry, but[/STRIKE] There's nothing to be sorry about.

Can I call this a "whirligig" ?

View attachment 1569

Like JMurray, I and everybody I know calls that a top.

Surprisingly, however, most of the dictionaries here also call it a whirligig.
 

MikeNewYork

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Like JMurray, I and everybody I know calls that a top.

Surprisingly, however, most of the dictionaries here also call it a whirligig.

Interesting. I have never heard that called anything but a top.
 

konungursvia

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Canadian kids mainly call those windmills too, but it's an incorrect term, they only look somewhat like windmills. In fact it's a pinwheel.
 

Love Teaching

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'Whirligig' appears to be the AmE word for what British children call windmills.

Click here to see pictures of windmills, though you have to scroll a long way down that page to find this — a similar
thing to the whirligig.

However, I don't understand what you mean by a 'thread whirligig'.

Rover
Thanks everyone for your comments.
So I decided to call it "pinwheel". The idea of "Thread Pinwheel" comes from a kind of pinwheel in which thread is used. It's a pinwheel to which pieces of thread are attached. The question "Does it work?" doesn't matter, I'm just wondering if this combination makes sense and if the sentences / definitions above fit this combination "Thread Pinwheel".
Thanks.
 

MikeNewYork

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Thanks everyone for your comments.
So I decided to call it "pinwheel". The idea of "Thread Pinwheel" comes from a kind of pinwheel in which thread is used. It's a pinwheel to which pieces of thread are attached. The question "Does it work?" doesn't matter, I'm just wondering if this combination makes sense and if the sentences / definitions above fit this combination "Thread Pinwheel".
Thanks.

If you search the Internet for "thread pinwheel" (use the quotation marks), you will find that that name is used for pinwheels that are sewn, as for a quilt.
 

SoothingDave

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Some people apparently call the seeds that fall from maple trees "whirligigs." I've always known them as "helicopters."
 
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