will and would

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imany

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Hi

I have two questions:

1- what will , would , may ...... called, i mean the term we used to call those group of words?

2- How can I use those terms?

:hi:
 

Tdol

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imany said:
Hi

I have two questions:

1- what will , would , may ...... called, i mean the term we used to call those group of words?

2- How can I use those terms?

:hi:

They are called modal verbs, or modal auxiliary verbs. :lol:
 
I

imany

Guest
Hi

Thanks for your answer.

I checked resources available on the link you sent, but there are no enough examples.

Are there any more resources available on the internet?

:hi:
 
J

John D

Guest
will would

Hi imany :D .

What will happen if I push that red button?
Answer:- The machine will stop.
Relating to the present time. Now.

What would happen if I pushed that red button?
Answer:- The machine would stop.
Relating more to the future.


What may happen if I push that red button?
Answer:- You may hurt your finger.

Hope this helps.

:roll:
 

Tdol

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Will is used for the future that is possible or likely to happen, or out of our control:
Tomorrow will be Thursday.
Would is used for things that are imaginary now or unlikley to happen in the future.

Try this link:
 
J

John D

Guest
Hi again imany :) .

A few more examples:-

What will happen if I help you in this forum?
You will gain some knowledge.
A definite answer.

What would happen if I helped you in this forum?
You would gain some knowledge, perhaps.
A less definite answer.

What may happen if I help you in this forum.
You may fall asleep with boredom.
A negative answer.

Hope these help.
 
I

imany

Guest
Test me?


I would travel to Paris next month ( I am not sure)

I will travel to Paris next month ( I am sure)


right?

:hi:
 

blacknomi

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#1
Would you tell Jenny?
==> I interpret this as a polite request to ask Jenny to do something if she would like to. Someone is asking Jenny a favor.

#2
Will you tell Jenny?
==> I interpret this as a indirect request that someone hope Jenny can do something and Jenny might not have too much choice ( of course, she can turn down any request as she doesn't feel like doing.)


Or maybe I was wrong. Both sentences don't make much difference. Only that 'would' is more polite than 'will'.


How about this?

#3
Would you please help?

#4
Will you help?


I look forward to your answer.



Sabrina
 

blacknomi

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#1
Would you tell Jenny?
==> I interpret this as a polite request to ask Jenny to do something if she would like to. Someone is asking Jenny a favor.

#2
Will you tell Jenny?
==> I interpret this as a indirect request that someone hope Jenny can do something and Jenny might not have too much choice ( of course, she can turn down any request as she doesn't feel like doing.)


Or maybe I was wrong. Both sentences don't make much difference. Only that 'would' is more polite than 'will'.


How about this?

#3
Would you please help?

#4
Will you help?


I look forward to your answer.



Sabrina
 

blacknomi

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I think my question is different from the previous one that was discussed. It has little to do with 'tense' problem. ( I could be wrong.) :wink:
 

blacknomi

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I think my question is different from the previous one that was discussed. It has little to do with 'tense' problem. ( I could be wrong.) :wink:
 

Francois

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 15, 2004
Would you tell Jenny?
==> I interpret this as a polite request to ask Jenny to do something if she would like to. Someone is asking Jenny a favor.
You're actually asking someone else to tell Jenny something. You're right that you ask that person a sort of favor, though.

Will you tell Jenny?
==> I interpret this as a indirect request that someone hope Jenny can do something and Jenny might not have too much choice ( of course, she can turn down any request as she doesn't feel like doing.)
Hmmm, it can be a neutral question (eg . "Will you tell Jenny if I tell you a secret?"), or it can be an order too eg. "Will you tell your grandma what you've done with her denture!". If you say "He will tell Jenny", this means you're certain this is going happen eg. "Whatever you tell Chandler, he will tell Jenny the minute you leave him."
If you say "she won't do anything", 'will' is close in meaning to 'want' => "she doesn't want to do anything".

FRC
 

Francois

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 15, 2004
Would you tell Jenny?
==> I interpret this as a polite request to ask Jenny to do something if she would like to. Someone is asking Jenny a favor.
You're actually asking someone else to tell Jenny something. You're right that you ask that person a sort of favor, though.

Will you tell Jenny?
==> I interpret this as a indirect request that someone hope Jenny can do something and Jenny might not have too much choice ( of course, she can turn down any request as she doesn't feel like doing.)
Hmmm, it can be a neutral question (eg . "Will you tell Jenny if I tell you a secret?"), or it can be an order too eg. "Will you tell your grandma what you've done with her denture!". If you say "He will tell Jenny", this means you're certain this is going happen eg. "Whatever you tell Chandler, he will tell Jenny the minute you leave him."
If you say "she won't do anything", 'will' is close in meaning to 'want' => "she doesn't want to do anything".

FRC
 

blacknomi

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Student or Learner
Francois said:
blacknomi said:
Would you tell Jenny?
==> I interpret this as a polite request to ask Jenny to do something if she would like to. Someone is asking Jenny a favor.
You're actually asking someone else to tell Jenny something. You're right that you ask that person a sort of favor, though.

Thanks. Is it possible that there is zero condition here? Maybe the speaker didn't finish his words. Or it is just a more polite request and I can use 'will' if I want to. They don't really contrast in meaning. Right?
==>Would you tell Jenny (if you meet her on MSN?) (zero conditonal?)



Francois said:
blacknomi said:
Will you tell Jenny?
==> I interpret this as a indirect request that someone hope Jenny can do something and Jenny might not have too much choice ( of course, she can turn down any request as she doesn't feel like doing.)
Hmmm, it can be a neutral question (eg . "Will you tell Jenny if I tell you a secret?"), or it can be an order too eg.
FRC

As in your example, I noticed that you put 'if-clause' after the main clause. It is different from my example. Your example contains zero condition, it doesn't funtion as a simple request as in Will you tell Jenny".

What do you think?
 

blacknomi

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Joined
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Member Type
Student or Learner
Francois said:
blacknomi said:
Would you tell Jenny?
==> I interpret this as a polite request to ask Jenny to do something if she would like to. Someone is asking Jenny a favor.
You're actually asking someone else to tell Jenny something. You're right that you ask that person a sort of favor, though.

Thanks. Is it possible that there is zero condition here? Maybe the speaker didn't finish his words. Or it is just a more polite request and I can use 'will' if I want to. They don't really contrast in meaning. Right?
==>Would you tell Jenny (if you meet her on MSN?) (zero conditonal?)



Francois said:
blacknomi said:
Will you tell Jenny?
==> I interpret this as a indirect request that someone hope Jenny can do something and Jenny might not have too much choice ( of course, she can turn down any request as she doesn't feel like doing.)
Hmmm, it can be a neutral question (eg . "Will you tell Jenny if I tell you a secret?"), or it can be an order too eg.
FRC

As in your example, I noticed that you put 'if-clause' after the main clause. It is different from my example. Your example contains zero condition, it doesn't funtion as a simple request as in Will you tell Jenny".

What do you think?
 

Francois

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 15, 2004
Yes, you can discard the if-clauses in all these sentences, this doesn't change the meaning. I just added some context to try and make things clearer.

FRC
 

Francois

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 15, 2004
Yes, you can discard the if-clauses in all these sentences, this doesn't change the meaning. I just added some context to try and make things clearer.

FRC
 

blacknomi

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Apr 21, 2004
Member Type
Student or Learner
Francois said:
Yes, you can discard the if-clauses in all these sentences, this doesn't change the meaning. I just added some context to try and make things clearer.

FRC

Thanks a lot for your rescue! :)
 

blacknomi

Key Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2004
Member Type
Student or Learner
Francois said:
Yes, you can discard the if-clauses in all these sentences, this doesn't change the meaning. I just added some context to try and make things clearer.

FRC

Thanks a lot for your rescue! :)
 
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