Willy

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Hi guys,

I have questions about the uses of will and going to. I would say especially about predictions.
Can you please telll me when I use will or going to for predictions?
And for exemple if a doctor who has already examined the patient with an Ultrasound or stuff and therefore is sure about the patient´s pregnancy would say: She´s going to have a baby or she will have a baby. Is there any specific explanation for using Will or Going to when Scientific studies have been conducted and the person knows the prediction is something which is almost a sure thing ?
Thank you,
Willy
 

Anglika

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"going to" indicates a future event:

She is going to have a baby.
We are going to the party.

"Will have" is used to talk about what is going to happen in the future, especially things that you are certain about or things that are planned:

She will have a baby next summer.
We will have a party at the weekend.

In your scenario of a scan, the doctor is most likely to say "She is pregnant".

As to scientific writing, perhaps you can suggest uses.
 

Wuisi

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I have always been told two things. First of all, 'will' is more formal than 'going to' for predictions and second, 'will' just expresses your opinion -just your idea : She will have an accident if she goes on driving like that'- and 'going to' expresses what you think the outcome will be, but this time it is not your personal opinio but rather based on some present evidence -at least evidence for the speaker- 'She is going to have an accident' (there is a big stone in the middle of the road, you can see it from the place where you are but the driver can't because it is at the end of a sharp turning, for example). So, I think the doctor, after breaking the good news and telling her 'You are pregnant' will say 'You are going to have a baby' if the patient asked for clarification.
 

puzzle

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AnglikaRe: Willy
"going to" indicates a future event:

She is going to have a baby.
We are going to the party.

"Will have" is used to talk about what is going to happen in the future, especially things that you are certain about or things that are planned:

She will have a baby next summer.
We will have a party at the weekend.

I am still a little confused.
"She will have a baby next summer" means she plans to have a baby, right?
"We will have a party at the weekend" means the party may be cancelled, right?

Please.
 

Anglika

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I am still a little confused.
"She will have a baby next summer" means she plans to have a baby, right?
"We will have a party at the weekend" means the party may be cancelled, right? No - it means that we will have a party at the weekend - we have planned to hold a party at the weekend . If it is in doubt, it would be "We may/might have a party...."

Please.
.
 

Clare James

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There is no absolute hard and fast rule about these two ways about talking about predictions. The way I often explain this to my students is this:

You often use the 'going to' future form for predictions where there is some evidence about the future. For example, if you can see big black clouds in the sky, you can say 'It's going to rain.' or if you see a huge woman who is obviously pregnant, you can say 'She's going to have a baby.' If you feel terrible, you can say 'I'm going to be sick.' For all these examples, there is some evidence, some reason for your prediction.

The 'will' form is often used for predictions with 'I think'. For example, you might ask someone 'Which team do you think will win the match?' or 'I don't think the train will be late.' You don't really have any concrete evidence about your prediction, but it's an opinion about the future.

As I said, these are not solid fixed rules, and native speakers use the forms in lots of other ways, too, but these are guidelines to help you to choose which form you think will sound best when you're speaking.

Hope this has been useful for you.

Clare
ELTgames.com
 

gpfaraujo

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To all of you,
Many thanks! Your explanation was very clear.
:)
 
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puzzle

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Clare,Anglika,:-DThank you!
 

Phoenix Wu

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There is no absolute hard and fast rule about these two ways about talking about predictions. The way I often explain this to my students is this:

You often use the 'going to' future form for predictions where there is some evidence about the future. For example, if you can see big black clouds in the sky, you can say 'It's going to rain.' or if you see a huge woman who is obviously pregnant, you can say 'She's going to have a baby.' If you feel terrible, you can say 'I'm going to be sick.' For all these examples, there is some evidence, some reason for your prediction.

The 'will' form is often used for predictions with 'I think'. For example, you might ask someone 'Which team do you think will win the match?' or 'I don't think the train will be late.' You don't really have any concrete evidence about your prediction, but it's an opinion about the future.

As I said, these are not solid fixed rules, and native speakers use the forms in lots of other ways, too, but these are guidelines to help you to choose which form you think will sound best when you're speaking.

Hope this has been useful for you.

Clare
ELTgames.com

You are good teacher...I understand what you say....English Grammar it is interesting;-)
 
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