windswept jerkwater town

JACEK1

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Hello everybody!

What would you call a little town, where the wind blows all the year round. It is also called a place (the end of the world), where wingless seagulls fly and snow falls horizontally.

Do you think that windswept jerkwater town is the proper name?

Thank you
 

Tdol

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Jerkwater means small and unimportant to this one here.
 

Rover_KE

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Where did you encounter that sentence, JACEK1?
 

Tarheel

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Wingless seagulls?
 

JACEK1

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I made this sentence up myself. I know that you may not know what I am talking about. This is the description of the town filled with materialism, rat race. All that people in this town talk about is money. Wingless seagulls and snow falling horizontally are a funny way to describe this crazy little town. The seagulls are as greedy for food as the people are greedy for money. Bellies of the seagulls are never filled.
 

emsr2d2

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I'm pretty sure people demonstrating for causes close to their hearts don't need sidewalks! ;-)
 

SoothingDave

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"Jerkwater towns" were stops along the railroad which served to replenish the water supply for the steam engines.

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/jerkwater

[FONT=&quot]As a result, the small trains that ran on rural branch lines often had to stop to take on water from local supplies. Such trains were commonly called "jerkwaters" from the motion of jerking the water up in buckets from the supply to the engine. The derogatory use of "jerkwater" for things unimportant or trivial reflects the fact that these jerkwater trains typically ran on lines connecting small middle-of-nowhere towns.[/FONT]
 
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