with and without "first"

altiwife

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Jan 24, 2017
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Have a look at sentence #1.
You'll have to disable the alarm system before you enter the house.
Now take a look at sentence #2.
You'll have to disable the alarm system first before you enter the house.

Refering to my native language German sentence #2 is absolutely natural and commonly used.
What about the usage of "first" in English? Does it sound natural? Is it often used this way?
 

teechar

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It's fine. I'm more likely to use "before going into the house" or "before you go into the house" in that sentence.
 

emsr2d2

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I find the use of "first before" unnatural.

You have to disable the alarm before you enter the house.
If you want to enter the house, you'll have to disable the alarm first.
 

SoothingDave

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The "first" is redundant, but it is natural to me. For emphasis, anyway. I don't find it unnatural.
 

bubbha

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The "first" and "before" are separate; it's not a two-word term.

It's "You'll have to disable the alarm system first" + "before you enter the house".
 
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